Category Archives: meaning-making

On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

***This post contains spoilers!  If you are reading this, and you haven’t finished Oryx and Crake, step away from the computer and get back to it!*** I read Oryx and Crake primarily as a novel of trauma, extending past the genocidal crescendo of… Continue reading

Posted in Atwood, biomedicine, biopolitics, disillusion, dystopia, ethics, gender, meaning-making, narrative, narrative structure, Novelists, Oryx and Crake, Science Fiction, subjectivity | Comments Off on On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

Objectivity, and Other Myths We Tell Ourselves

I come to my literature degree still carrying the baggage of having worked in a hospital operating room for a long time. Maybe it is not surprising to say that I have left filled with images and stories, and I am still trying to find a way of articulat… Continue reading

Posted in 20th Century, biomedicine, history of science, Lorraine Daston, meaning-making, objectivity, Peter Galison, subjectivity, Visuality | Comments Off on Objectivity, and Other Myths We Tell Ourselves

The Meaning of Words: Dystopias, Utopias and the Lingusitic

As lovers of literature, we are no strangers to the world of language and expression. But what happens when a society is built upon the tenant that the words not only don’t exist, but carry no meaning? Erin Pellarin explores the meanings words can have on society and personal feeling, comparing John’s repertoire of Shakespearean […] Continue reading

Posted in Brave New World, culture, dystopia, Huxley, linguistics, meaning-making, Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, Science and humanities, Shakespeare, words | Comments Off on The Meaning of Words: Dystopias, Utopias and the Lingusitic