Category Archives: medical ethics

[BONUS] A Short History of Body Snatching

Prior to 1832, in the United Kingdom it was only legal for medical schools and anatomists to perform dissections on the bodies of executed criminals. Due to this restriction, there was an extreme shortage of available cadavers, especially as more students became drawn to the medical profession in the 18th and 19th centuries. As a […] Continue reading

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A New Age of Eugenics?

Within the genre of science fiction, the issue of eugenics and the evolution of mankind through selective reproduction and genetic manipulation has played a prominent role works such as Frank Herbert’s Dune, Robert Heinlein’s Methuselah’s Children, and Octavia E. Butler’s Lilith’s Brood trilogy to name only a few. While commonly dismissed in the present-day as […] Continue reading

Posted in Biology, Butler, Octavia, CRISPR, Eugenics, evolution, Fiction, genetic engineering, genetic ethics, genetic manipulation, genetics, Heinlein, humanities, medical ethics | Comments Off on A New Age of Eugenics?

Money Speaks Louder than Human Voices

“Everything has a price.” This phrase in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake is not new, but it takes on a new meaning in the context of her novel (139). In today’s world, corporations dominate in every sphere from the economy to religion and politics. While Atwood’s world in which corporations have absolute control is unsettling, […] Continue reading

Posted in Biology, Capitalism, clones, Cloning, ethics, Fiction, Humanity, medical ethics, science, Science Fiction, Scientists, SF, technology | Comments Off on Money Speaks Louder than Human Voices

What Do We Sacrifice For “Perfection”?

It looked like any other hospital waiting room. Well, any other hospital waiting room in the year 2050. I’ve been told that you weren’t kept behind bars like a common criminal. I’ve been told the doors didn’t always have locks on the outside. Hell, I’ve even been told the rooms had chairs to sit in. […] Continue reading

Posted in biological engineering, biological modification, Biology, creative writing, criminal, cure, defect, disabilities, disability, ethical dilemma, ethics, evolution, Fiction, Future, gender, genetic engineering, genetic modification, genetic perfection, genetics, hospital, medical ethics, medicine, Morality, morals, procedure, Sci-Fi, science, Science Fiction, sex change, sexual orientation, social change, transexual, transgender, transsexual | Comments Off on What Do We Sacrifice For “Perfection”?

Mounds of Venus, or What a Pile of Goddess Guts Can Teach Us About Objectivity

In their history of science tome, Objectivity (2010), Daston and Galison examine how the modern concept of objectivity emerged from the mid-nineteenth-century sciences. They argue that this ideal of objectivity requires “the suppression of some aspec… Continue reading

Posted in 19th Century, anatomical venus, erotic science, exquisite corpse, Gender studies, history of science, lady parts, Lorraine Daston, medical ethics, Peter Galison, torso explosion, Visuality | Comments Off on Mounds of Venus, or What a Pile of Goddess Guts Can Teach Us About Objectivity

Perowne’s Decision: Causality and Consequences

Put yourself in Henry Perowne’s shoes. Your beloved car is hit by a man who failed to look before pulling out.  This man is legally at fault for the accident, but argues to the contrary.  He attempts to extort $750.00 from you as recompense for damages.  When you refuse to pay up, he settles for […] Continue reading

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