Category Archives: Milton

Blake’s Private Affairs: Censoring Poetic Genius

The engraving from William Blake’s Plate 49 depicting Los engaged in sodomy is a non-secular subject in which Blake explicitly alludes to (but does not name) the tyrannical government in power- most likely of Napoleon’s, but openly assigned to treat authorities such as our current Trump presidency. Along with the anthropocentric charges, “Who creeps into […] Continue reading

Posted in beast fable, critique of government, eroticism, ezlivin, Jerusalem, male gazing, Milton, moral sex, Ololon, oothoon, The Last Judgment (4/4-4/11) | Comments Off on Blake’s Private Affairs: Censoring Poetic Genius

Fellas, is it Blakian?

 “Milton will utterly consume us & thee our beloved Father”  In Milton: Book the Second, Blake finds himself in the garden. Ololon meets Blake and then eventually finds Milton, and we find out that she is Milton’s feminine self. Blake express that Ololon’s position as a virgin is one that puts her in an “annihilable” […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Blake, Milton, Oral, Self, sex, The Last Judgment (4/4-4/11), William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Fellas, is it Blakian?

Problems of Satirical Representation: Milton and the Female Muse

William Blake’s Milton “Book the First” is introduced with images of Beulah and her daughters. This reminded me of the image of Oothoon surrounded by both her tormented lover and rapist.  Milton’s emanations are for Blake the earthly contradictions beheld in the “heavens of Albion,” (148). Death and annihilation are central themes for Blake, but […] Continue reading

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Milton, Spectres, and Flowers

In William Blake’s Milton: Book the First, Blake critiques John Milton’s intents in Paradise Lost. Despite, his admiration for Milton, Blake believes that Milton’s idea that relegating revolutionary energy was diabolic. Instead, he thinks that was diabolic was Milton’s “selfhood” or self righteousness, to put in other terms. In Line 8-11 he states: The Eternal Great […] Continue reading

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Bounding the Poetic Genius

In plate 2 of William Blake’s “Milton: Book the First”, the oppressed poetic Genius is revealed within the renowned poet John Milton, author of Paradise Lost. Blake writes how the poetic Genius is called upon in Milton through various physical awareness, specifically focusing on tactile imagery (that of touch), to highlight this. Blake mentions how […] Continue reading

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why’s satan trying to be god so bad?

Milton martyrs himself as the savior of his people, which is ironic because he doesn’t agree on the ideas of war or any type of heroic characteristic for that matter. However, he’s being forced into the eternal death because God is inactive in the fight against satan; he takes off his robe of promise, that […] Continue reading

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Where He Belongs

By now, I think we have figured out that Blake enjoys his “Genius” and that to retain his “Genius,” he must reside with Los in Hell. It seems that when Milton rose and claimed he was going to “Eternal Death.” He essentially means that he is abandoning the heavens. “Then Milton rose up from the […] Continue reading

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Blake’s Milton: the Quest for Self-Annihilation

For next Wednesday (4/4), students will answer the following question: Why does Milton need to “go down to self annihilation and eternal death”? (book 1, plate 15, line 22; page 162) Because this poem is so dense and confusing, I ask that students provide a close reading of ONE of the six passages listed below […] Continue reading

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Ololon’s False Self-Identification

In forming a contrary, two opposing ideas or being create a new, fuller meaning in their relationship to one another.  Despite Ololon’s self-identification as Milton’s contrary, she does not fulfill this purpose.  Notably, Olonon’s self-identification as Milton’s contrary comes in the form of a question; even this status depends on his validation.  The question is […] Continue reading

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Mutual Annihilation or Patriarchal Possessiveness?

In answering the question of what precisely happens to Ololon, how such fits in, relates, to the rest of Milton: A Poem, I feel, firstly, a few prefatory remarks—a naming of parts or clarifying of terms—is required. I take “self-annihilation,” as it manifests, in the scope of Blake’s poem at face value, that is, meaning […] Continue reading

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