Category Archives: Milton

False Forgiveness

In Alejandro’s post, he argues that the character Milton in Milton a Poem begs God for forgiveness due to his “self-righteous” and indulgent nature. The plate above would compliment this post well as it depicts the relationship between Milton and God, as Milton seemingly reaches for him in grief and atonement. This plate could also […] Continue reading

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Poetic Genius vs. Evil Genius

Why does Milton need to “go down self annihilation and eternal death” ?(book 1, plate 15, line 22; page 162)   William Blake and Milton were alike in that both creatives were open to the exploration of ideas greatly repressed during the era of their time, including those in which were embedded in religion and […] Continue reading

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Milton Beyond the Grave

In the first part of his grand poem Milton, William Blake comes up with his own various interpretations of his favorite writer and creator of Paradise Lost, John Milton. In his recounting of his life and call to use some of Milton’s energy in his own writing, it is clear that Milton had to “go down […] Continue reading

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An Examination of Metaphorical Self-Flagellation

When Blake refers to “self annihilation and eternal death,” what he is forecasting to the audience that there is a moment of understanding that both the character of Milton and the author Blake need to get over their self-righteousness for the greater good and what that means for both individuals. When looking through the text, […] Continue reading

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Mortal Milton and Self-Annihilation

In Plate 15 of Blake’s Milton, Milton needs to “go down to self annihilation and eternal death” (Pl 15, ln 22) to revert back to human and fight against his Selfhood. Selfhood in this text can be characterized as “prideful self-righteousness” (Blake’s Poetry and Designs 145) that is intensified when one’s ideas are worshipped and taken as law. […] Continue reading

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Blake’s Private Affairs: Censoring Poetic Genius

The engraving from William Blake’s Plate 49 depicting Los engaged in sodomy is a non-secular subject in which Blake explicitly alludes to (but does not name) the tyrannical government in power- most likely of Napoleon’s, but openly assigned to treat authorities such as our current Trump presidency. Along with the anthropocentric charges, “Who creeps into […] Continue reading

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Fellas, is it Blakian?

 “Milton will utterly consume us & thee our beloved Father”  In Milton: Book the Second, Blake finds himself in the garden. Ololon meets Blake and then eventually finds Milton, and we find out that she is Milton’s feminine self. Blake express that Ololon’s position as a virgin is one that puts her in an “annihilable” […] Continue reading

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Problems of Satirical Representation: Milton and the Female Muse

William Blake’s Milton “Book the First” is introduced with images of Beulah and her daughters. This reminded me of the image of Oothoon surrounded by both her tormented lover and rapist.  Milton’s emanations are for Blake the earthly contradictions beheld in the “heavens of Albion,” (148). Death and annihilation are central themes for Blake, but […] Continue reading

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Milton, Spectres, and Flowers

In William Blake’s Milton: Book the First, Blake critiques John Milton’s intents in Paradise Lost. Despite, his admiration for Milton, Blake believes that Milton’s idea that relegating revolutionary energy was diabolic. Instead, he thinks that was diabolic was Milton’s “selfhood” or self righteousness, to put in other terms. In Line 8-11 he states: The Eternal Great […] Continue reading

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Bounding the Poetic Genius

In plate 2 of William Blake’s “Milton: Book the First”, the oppressed poetic Genius is revealed within the renowned poet John Milton, author of Paradise Lost. Blake writes how the poetic Genius is called upon in Milton through various physical awareness, specifically focusing on tactile imagery (that of touch), to highlight this. Blake mentions how […] Continue reading

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