Category Archives: mulvey

Final Project: Women Who Look in Hitchcock’s Films

For my final project, I plan to examine the female gaze/women who look within the work of Alfred Hitchcock.  I will look at Rear Window (1954), Suspicion (1941), and either Vertigo (1958) or Shadow or a Doubt (1943), but possibly both. … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Class Blog, Female Spectator, Gaze, hitchcock, Hooks, Modelski, mulvey, rear window, Shadow of a Doubt, Suspicion, Vertigo | Comments Off on Final Project: Women Who Look in Hitchcock’s Films

Symbolism in “Bound”

As I thought about “Bound” after the film screening, I realized there are a lot of really interesting symbols and images throughout the film.  Some of the most titillating symbols were blood and money, fingers, night/darkness, paint, and characters’ names.  … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in blood, Bound, Caesar, Class Blog, Corky, darkness, fingers, homophobia, lesbian, Money, mulvey, power, symbolism, Violet | Comments Off on Symbolism in “Bound”

Women – a necessity or a sufficiency?

When watching Rear Window, I had various other film ideas in my mind, having seen one of the international lens films a few days earlier: Jose y Pilar, Silver Linings Playbook the night before, and Pitch Perfect the night before … Continue reading Continue reading

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Jeff and Lisa’s Gender Dynamics in Rear Window

Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window presents an opportunity to explore Laura Mulvey’s critique of cinematic tradition in “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema,” particularly since Mulvey herself uses Rear Window as an example of Hitchcock’s predilection for voyeurism in his films (7-8). … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Alfred Hitchcock, Class Blog, Gaze, gender, Modleski, mulvey, rear window | Comments Off on Jeff and Lisa’s Gender Dynamics in Rear Window

The Power of the Spectator

Watching the movie Rear Window was an interesting experience for me. Initially, I thought the movie was boring and I did not really understand the significance of many of the scenes. However, after talking it over with my friend in … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in "The Master's Dollhouse", Class Blog, control, mulvey, power, spectator, watching | Comments Off on The Power of the Spectator

Fragmentation and Flashbacks in Veronica Mars

What I found interesting about the text of Laura Mulvey is when she talks about the female body and how this is fragmented. Through editing and framing the female body gets ‘cut’ into pieces. The female body becomes an object, … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Class Blog, Flashback, Fragmentation, Gaze, Laura Mulvey, mulvey, Veronica Mars | Comments Off on Fragmentation and Flashbacks in Veronica Mars

Little Miss Sunshine

For this blog entry, I decided to analyze the film Little Miss Sunshine using John Berger’s, Laura Mulvey’s and bell hooks’ writings.  Little Miss Sunshine’s plot revolves around a dysfunctional family taking a road trip to get the family’s youngest … Continue reading Continue reading

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Another look at Mad Men

In the book “Ways of Seeing,” John Berger dissects the role of the male gaze as it applies to European oil paintings of nude women.  According to Berger, nudes represent the objectification of women in society in that they are … Continue reading Continue reading

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Analysis of Gaze in “Nashville”

In the writing questionnaire, I described a scene from the pilot episode of the show “Nashville”; I now plan to revisit this scene with Berger’s and Mulvey’s arguments in mind.  To recap, the scene I discussed is a short (10-second) … Continue reading Continue reading

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The Self-Reflexive Gaze: From Eroticism to Humor

Laura Mulvey’s seminal essay “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” interrogates cinematic history, and finds it to be decidedly patriarchal. Mulvey documents, fairly convincingly, the ways in which women are eroticized and fetishized as visual objects: for the (male) characters within … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in berger, Class Blog, Gaze, Louie, Louis C.K., mulvey, patriarchy, Ways of Seeing | Comments Off on The Self-Reflexive Gaze: From Eroticism to Humor