Category Archives: narrative structure

On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

***This post contains spoilers!  If you are reading this, and you haven’t finished Oryx and Crake, step away from the computer and get back to it!*** I read Oryx and Crake primarily as a novel of trauma, extending past the genocidal crescendo of… Continue reading

Posted in Atwood, biomedicine, biopolitics, disillusion, dystopia, ethics, gender, meaning-making, narrative, narrative structure, Novelists, Oryx and Crake, Science Fiction, subjectivity | Comments Off on On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

Caged in Desire, or How to Read an Unreliable Narrator: Anxiety, Projection, and Crushes in Henry James’s In the Cage

I’d like to open this post with some mood music: There we go.  That sets the stage nicely. In other words, In the Cage is a stomach-turning read for any fantasy-prone person (re: most of us) who has ever had an unrequited crush.  Let’s th… Continue reading

Posted in "victorian literature, 19th Century, disillusion, Freud, Gender studies, Henry James, humanities, In the Cage, mechanical servant, narrative, narrative structure, Novelists, subjectivity | Comments Off on Caged in Desire, or How to Read an Unreliable Narrator: Anxiety, Projection, and Crushes in Henry James’s In the Cage

The Politics of Knowledge II: Revenge of the Knowledge

Dan Fang extends the discussion of information and narrative structure that Pellarin started, but she instead focuses on the way Kathy presents the book, not the way the future is presented to the Hailsham students. Although Pellarin mentioned a parallel between the way information is withheld from the students to the way that information is […] Continue reading

Posted in knowledge, narrative structure, Never Let Me Go | Comments Off on The Politics of Knowledge II: Revenge of the Knowledge

The Politics of Knowledge: Why “Never Let Me Go” never lets me go

“Knowledge is Power,” the old slogan says. But is that always necessarily true? Erin Pellarin discusses just how powerless knowledge can be in the face of unchangeable circumstances, how even though the main characters of Never Let Me Go are eventually fully aware of what’s going to happen to them, they still are unable to do […] Continue reading

Posted in activity versus passivity, Cloning, Dissemination of information, Ethics of science, fate, Kazuo Ishiguro, narrative structure, Never Let Me Go, reader response, role of education | Comments Off on The Politics of Knowledge: Why “Never Let Me Go” never lets me go