Category Archives: narrative

That Dragon, Cancer, and the Role of Crowd Funding

Even a quick glance at the home page for That Dragon, Cancer reveals the origins of the game. While originally a small-time endeavor, many donations through Kickstarter, a crowd funding website, allowed the game to achieve the style and recognition that we see today. It’s not surprising, then, to see the home page for the game … Continue reading “That Dragon, Cancer, and the Role of Crowd Funding” Continue reading

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Walking Simulators and the Importance of Narrative

In class on Thursday, one of the complaints that people had towards That Dragon, Cancer was that it wasn’t really a “game;” instead, it was more of an interactive narrative.  They went on to say that, since they were expecting a more gameplay-driven experience, the extreme focus on story and lack of choices that That Dragon, … Continue reading “Walking Simulators and the Importance of Narrative” Continue reading

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Interacting with Fiction

What makes a game a game? A game can be almost anything that has rules that define how to play and how to reach the end of the game. However, there are many games that feel more like an interactive story or experience than the traditional idea of a game. This is the case with … Continue reading “Interacting with Fiction” Continue reading

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Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings: Is it really an allegory?

To be honest, the first time I read The Lord of the Rings, I didn’t think that it could be allegorical of anything at all. It was a highly fictional world with Elves and Dwarves and Magical Rings that are just too imaginative to be part of the real world. To me, Lord of the … Continue reading “Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings: Is it really an allegory?” Continue reading

Posted in Allegory, Fiction, Gaming, J.R.R. Tolkien, literary criticism, Lord of the Rings, Lord of the Rings (movie), narrative, Opinion, Tolkien | Comments Off on Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings: Is it really an allegory?

Braid, WHY YOU (sic) SO HARD!

I must admit, I don’t play online games very much. The last time I played a “legitimate downloadable game was when I was about 13- a game based on Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None. Other than that, my extent on gaming are mostly non-fictitious gaming titles, such as the Madden NFL Series. However, … Continue reading “Braid, WHY YOU (sic) SO HARD!” Continue reading

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Fiction and Reality

Starting off with Braid, we are faced with a very familiar looking platform game. While in the beginning, the game seems to be a take on the Super Mario Brothers game, as we delve deeper, we see that Jonathan Blow has used the seemingly simple platform to tell a far more modern and complex story. … Continue reading “Fiction and Reality” Continue reading

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New Clarity in Memory: How Braid Forces Us to Wade Through the Past

Our initial experience in the world of Braid may leave us with an impression of simplicity and straight-forwardness. We move to the right of the screen, like most platformers, and are greeted with a scenic backdrop and the promise of challenging levels and puzzles to solve. This sense changes as soon as we begin opening books and … Continue reading “New Clarity in Memory: How Braid Forces Us to Wade Through the Past” Continue reading

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When You Stare Into the Uncanny Valley, the Uncanny Valley Also Stares Into You: Posthuman Narratives in The Windup Girl

Like my dear colleague A.M. Lehr below, I also couldn’t help but make the comparison between Paolo Bacigaluipi’s The Windup Girl and E.T.A. Hoffman’s The Sandman… Possibly because of the “uncanny” resemblance in the … Continue reading

Posted in biopolitics, eta hoffman, Gender studies, jacques offenbach, narrative, Novelists, Paolo Bacigalupi, post-human, Science Fiction, technoscience, the sandman, The Windup Girl, uncanny, uncanny valley | Comments Off on When You Stare Into the Uncanny Valley, the Uncanny Valley Also Stares Into You: Posthuman Narratives in The Windup Girl

Nanotechnology and the NanoNarrative: Is Small the New Big?

Brooks Landon’s essay, “Less is More: Much Less is Much More: The Insistent Allure of Nanotechnology in Science Fiction” in the anthology, Nanoculture begins with a true statement of storytelling if I’ve ever heard one: “Size has … Continue reading

Posted in Brooks Landon, culture, history of science, homunculus, nanonarrative, nanotechnology, narrative, science, Science Fiction, Structure of Scientific Revolutions, technology, technoscience, Thomas Kuhn, Visuality | Comments Off on Nanotechnology and the NanoNarrative: Is Small the New Big?

On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

***This post contains spoilers!  If you are reading this, and you haven’t finished Oryx and Crake, step away from the computer and get back to it!*** I read Oryx and Crake primarily as a novel of trauma, extending past the genocidal crescendo of… Continue reading

Posted in Atwood, biomedicine, biopolitics, disillusion, dystopia, ethics, gender, meaning-making, narrative, narrative structure, Novelists, Oryx and Crake, Science Fiction, subjectivity | Comments Off on On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”