Category Archives: Oryx and Crake

On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

***This post contains spoilers!  If you are reading this, and you haven’t finished Oryx and Crake, step away from the computer and get back to it!*** I read Oryx and Crake primarily as a novel of trauma, extending past the genocidal crescendo of… Continue reading

Posted in Atwood, biomedicine, biopolitics, disillusion, dystopia, ethics, gender, meaning-making, narrative, narrative structure, Novelists, Oryx and Crake, Science Fiction, subjectivity | Comments Off on On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

Homo Sacer and the State of Exception in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake

~”The birth of the camp in our time appears as an event that decisively signals the political space of modernity itself”–Giorgio Agamben, Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life. In the introduction to Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power a… Continue reading

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Searching for MaddEve: Bare Life, Homo Sacer, and the Problem of Atwood’s Oryx

The labs and factory farms of Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake present us with a vertible zoo of zoē ─ a menagerie of bioforms that embody Giorgio Agamben’s concept of “bare life.” During his tour of Watson-Crick’s NeoAgriculturals wing, Continue reading

Posted in Agamben, Atwood, Margaret, bare life, biopolitics, Bride of Frankenstein, ChickieNobs, Gender studies, Homo Sacer, Jimmy, MaddAdam, MaddEve, Oryx and Crake, Science Fiction, Sex trafficking, Snowman, subjectivity | Comments Off on Searching for MaddEve: Bare Life, Homo Sacer, and the Problem of Atwood’s Oryx

The Voice in His Head

One of the recurring features of Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake is the voice that keeps speaking in Snowman’s head, a voice whose tone is by turns condescending, instructional, pious, courageous, scolding, childish, and much else. The voice speak… Continue reading

Posted in Atwood, Margaret, biopolitics, Giorgio Agamben, Homo Sacer, language, Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake, Science Fiction, voice | Comments Off on The Voice in His Head

Are We There Yet?

“Are we there yet?” “No.” “Are we there yet?” “No.”  This classic question reaches past the 2005 movie starring Ice Cube to our childhoods. We begged parents to inform us of our exact location to gauge how far we had traveled and how far we had left until our destination- forever wondering about our wandering. […] Continue reading

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Tori Valadez and Mary Virginia Harper Final Project-Mental Illness, Homelessness, and Veterans

No copyright infringement intended. Used for educational purposes only.Filed under: Science and humanities Tagged: biology, Brave New World, Cloud Atlas, Homelessness, mental illness, Oryx and Crake, Veterans Continue reading

Posted in Biology, Brave New World, Cloud Atlas, Homelessness, mental illness, Oryx and Crake, Science and humanities, Veterans | Comments Off on Tori Valadez and Mary Virginia Harper Final Project-Mental Illness, Homelessness, and Veterans

What’s the Point?

In Magaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake, Crake tries to create a new race of human beings that he believed would be perfect. They wouldn’t suffer from sexual dissatisfaction, they would have no fear of death because they wouldn’t know when they might die, they would just drop dead all of the sudden. They would have […] Continue reading

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Dystopian Fictions As a Function of Their Times

Ever since dystopian and post-apocalyptic fiction became genres, both readers and critics alike have debated the predictive qualities of such texts. In hindsight, they sometimes seem to prophesy the future with eerie accuracy, like the “parlor walls” from Fahrenheit 451, which are oddly similar to today’s ever-present televisions. However, while it’s certainly tempting to draw […] Continue reading

Posted in Brave New World, dystopia, Future, Oryx and Crake, Posthuman, predict, Science Fiction, Super Sad True Love Story | Comments Off on Dystopian Fictions As a Function of Their Times

Corporate Control

Often, literature reflects our fears and magnifies them. So the abundance of novels revolving around total corporate control over society is an interesting reflection of our fears today. Several novels I can think of feature societies where corporations control everything. Oryx and Crake depicts a world where corporations keep their employees and families housed in […] Continue reading

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Really?

Crake is a believer in Rodan’s famous maxim, “I think, therefore I am.” Crake is almost comical in this regard. Anything that is thought of is real, although not necessarily physical and comprehendable. DISCLAIMER: Do not watch this video! As I began thinking about this blog post, the thought seemed to take on a life […] Continue reading

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