Category Archives: Poetic Genius

Revolution through Poetry

In Plates 17 and 18, lines 37-39, 1-11 (p. 106), why does Los prepare for epic war along with Orc, who arrives with “furious terrors” and “golden chariots”? Explain the significance of this cosmic battle for Blake’s prophetic vision of Europe. In Europe A Prophecy, William Blake uses the character’s representation to demonstrate his perspective […] Continue reading

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Deconstructing Institutions

Thus, far we have read various passages of Blake’s works, noting interpretations and meaning of such works. Interestingly enough, Blake has presented his distaste in binaries either from ideologies like right &  wrong, just & unjust, female & male, etc. Including, radical ideas like getting rid of institutionalized ideologies the evade within our social spheres. […] Continue reading

Posted in Empire vs. Revolution (10/16), French Revolution, Poetic Genius, politics, Religion, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Deconstructing Institutions

God’s (Innocent) Kids Aren’t Alright

My arrangement of the plates from William Blake’s Songs of Innocence aimed at recounting the observations and reflections of an omniscient narrator/onlooker. Through the my selections I formed a narrative that questions the effectiveness of religious faith as a form of personal and social governance. The poems I chose were “Holy Thursday,” “The Chimney Sweep,” and “On […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Holy Thursday, Innocence, Eden, and Childhood (9/11), On Anothers Sorrow, Poetic Genius, Religion, religious skepticism, Songs of Innocence, the chimney sweeper, William Blake | Comments Off on God’s (Innocent) Kids Aren’t Alright

Simple and Simply unsimple

William Blake’s rather unlighted and scornful attitude towards Reynold’s definition of a poetic genius is simply simple yet unsimple. According to Blak being a poetic Genuis, are those who are enlighted by the sciences and art with a take of their inspired, and individual originality. In other words, it is not that of which Reynold […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Blake's philosophy of art (9/4), Capitalism, duality, evil, good, Poetic Genius, Religion | Comments Off on Simple and Simply unsimple

Poetic Genius: The Artistic Exodus

William Blake’s inscription in “The Laocoon” is used to differentiate his liberating definition of art from Sir Joshua Reynolds. The analogy is a biblical reference to when the Israelites escaped their servitude to the Egyptians. Blake uses this context to call attention to the artificiality of the Nature that Reynolds views as the principle that […] Continue reading

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Bounding the Poetic Genius

In plate 2 of William Blake’s “Milton: Book the First”, the oppressed poetic Genius is revealed within the renowned poet John Milton, author of Paradise Lost. Blake writes how the poetic Genius is called upon in Milton through various physical awareness, specifically focusing on tactile imagery (that of touch), to highlight this. Blake mentions how […] Continue reading

Posted in Milton, Milton a Poem, Poetic Genius, The Last Judgment (11/6-11/13), Urizen | Comments Off on Bounding the Poetic Genius

I Believe I can Fly

In Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, “A Memorable Fancy,” is an eerie message in in which the Devil is basically tempting humanity to feel exaltation, even more so, by not just simply using our five senses, but finding a way to embody the same powers that God does to see, hear, touch, and […] Continue reading

Posted in Christ and the Body (9/25), Poetic Genius, William Blake, william blake marriage of heaven and hell, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on I Believe I can Fly

“The Heart Pathos”

Count Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf was a religious reformer better known for as a bishop of the Moravian church. He along with other Moravian followers believed in the the importance of our five senses, and the idea that attaining a relationship with God lies not in following order and practices, but through more of a […] Continue reading

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Filing for a divorce with hell.

Blakes touches on his idea of the poetic Genius again, in “Provers of Hell”; he claims that it is both a natural–not taught–kind of Genius, and that it isn’t necessarily the best looking process. Blake writes in lines 66-7: “Improvement makes strait roads, but the crooked roads without Improvement, are roads of Genius.” This goes […] Continue reading

Posted in Heaven and Hell, literature, Marriage of Heaven and Hell, Poetic Genius, Proverbs of Hell (2/14), teaching, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Filing for a divorce with hell.

Childhood: A Time of Laughter, or a Time of Weeping?

Have you ever caught yourself rewatching a film you watched as a child, or listen to a song you heard growing up, and finally understood the dark, or “scandalous” humor/lyrics used that you never understood as a child? I know it happens to me a lot, especially within my four years here in college. The reason […] Continue reading

Posted in childhood, Experience, Earth, and Adulthood (2/7), laughter, Poetic Genius, weeping, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Childhood: A Time of Laughter, or a Time of Weeping?