Category Archives: popular science

Education, Nanotechnology, and the Magic School Bus?: Rethinking the relationship between science and science-fiction

“Who, then, are the real ‘engineers of the future’?” -Colin Milbun, Nanovision In Nanovision, Colin Milburn explores the way in which scientific discourse and the generic conventions of science-fiction blur in the study of nanotechnology. Inde… Continue reading

Posted in Colin Milburn, education, humanities, Magic School Bus, N. Katherine Hayles, nanotechnology, Nanovision, popular science, science, Science Education, Science Fiction, technology, technoscience | Comments Off on Education, Nanotechnology, and the Magic School Bus?: Rethinking the relationship between science and science-fiction

Study Released: Children’s Literature May Not Be Sending the Right Message

There is a certain pleasure to be had in reading books like Kingsley’s The Water-Babies, if only because it is always funny to see so many blistering and well-aimed zingers in one place. You just have to admire the craft, especially when it’s done… Continue reading

Posted in "victorian literature, bedtime stories, biopolitics, Charles Kingsley, Children's Literature, Darwin, Hypocrisy, Kingsley, Charles, natural selection, popular science, role of scientists, Satire, snark, The Onion, Water-Babies | Comments Off on Study Released: Children’s Literature May Not Be Sending the Right Message

Minding Your Own Beeswax and the Middlemarch Twitterverse

“News is often dispersed as thoughtlessly and effectively as that pollen which the bees carry off (having no idea how powdery they are) when they are buzzing in search of their particular nectar.”  -George Eliot, Middlemarch, Book VI, Chap… Continue reading

Posted in " pollination, "social media, "victorian literature, 19th Century, bees, bioculture, biopolitics, culture, ecosystems, eliot, Eliot, George, Inception, Middlemarch, pollen, popular science, twitter | Comments Off on Minding Your Own Beeswax and the Middlemarch Twitterverse

“Answers to Questions” and Questioning the Answers

Science isn’t all about hard facts and intricate detail: mired in the stacks of glossy-paged textbooks, we often forget that science is about inquiry and discovery, and that it can be a lot of fun. Dan Fang reminds us of this fact as she discusses the “play” of science, inspired by an exhibit at the […] Continue reading

Posted in art museums, corporate scientist, entrepreneur, Frist Center, popular science, public persona, role of scientists, Science and humanities, Steven Shapin | Comments Off on “Answers to Questions” and Questioning the Answers

​”The Scientific Life” in Real Life: Steven Shapin and “Popular” Science

Killian C. Quigley draws a comparison between Steven Shapin’s The Scientific Life and Martin Robbins’s article “Scientists say…”, detailing the relationship between scientific progress and its popular perception. Robbins’s article focuses on the journalistic spread of misinformation, which can lead to misconceptions of science by the public. Meanwhile, Shapin’s purpose is to reevaluate the individual’s […] Continue reading

Posted in academia, consensus, Ethics of science, history of science, Martin Robbins, popular science, science journalism, sociology of science, Steven Shapin, technoscience, the diet industry, The Gu, The Guardian, the MMR scare | Comments Off on ​”The Scientific Life” in Real Life: Steven Shapin and “Popular” Science