Category Archives: Posthuman

Genetics and Environment: Final Project

The global population is expected to increase by almost 3 billion people by the year 2100. Genetic adaptations and manipulations will result in better nutrition, superior health, and longevity for these generations of humans. Despite the many positive outcomes positive eugenics can have for the individual, an increased population may have devastating affects on consumption, […] Continue reading

Posted in Class Projects, Cloning, Ethics of science, Eugenics, Gattaca, genetic determinism, genetic engineering, Posthuman, Science and humanities | Comments Off on Genetics and Environment: Final Project

Dystopian Fictions As a Function of Their Times

Ever since dystopian and post-apocalyptic fiction became genres, both readers and critics alike have debated the predictive qualities of such texts. In hindsight, they sometimes seem to prophesy the future with eerie accuracy, like the “parlor walls” from Fahrenheit 451, which are oddly similar to today’s ever-present televisions. However, while it’s certainly tempting to draw […] Continue reading

Posted in Brave New World, dystopia, Future, Oryx and Crake, Posthuman, predict, Science Fiction, Super Sad True Love Story | Comments Off on Dystopian Fictions As a Function of Their Times

What is the Meaning of Life ¿

Until the prophesies of “X-men” come to fruition and humanity undergoes an official onset evolution, the meaning of life is very simple. How different are we from the characters in Never Let Me Go?  As far as production and purpose are concerned, the average person’s impact upon the world, whether it be their destruction of the […] Continue reading

Posted in Ethics of science, Humanity, Meaning of Life, Never Let Me Go, philosophy, Posthuman, Religion and genetics, Science and humanities | Comments Off on What is the Meaning of Life ¿

Thanks For All The Murder, Shakespeare

“I’m one of the very few. It’s prohibited, you see. But as I make the laws here, I can also break them. With impunity…” What is culture, if not the stories and works it creates and venerates? The global society in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World is disturbing in their absence. In this day and age, more than […] Continue reading

Posted in Brave New World, Hypocrisy, Posthuman, Science and humanities, The Man | Comments Off on Thanks For All The Murder, Shakespeare

You Have to Consider the Idea that God does not Like You!

Writing this blog post is my pain; this is my burning hand, as is reading and grading it your pain. Even though Brad Pitt can make anything interesting, this scene from “Fight Club” encapsulates an angle not yet considered, and in all probability will not be, except for this blog post, that we do not […] Continue reading

Posted in Adam and Eve, Brad Pitt, Ethics of science, evolution, Films, Posthuman, Religion and genetics, Science and humanities, Science Fiction | Comments Off on You Have to Consider the Idea that God does not Like You!

A Forced Hand

“There is no fixed human characteristics, except for a general capability to choose what we want to be, to modify ourselves in accordance to fit our desires.” –Francis Fukuyama , Our Posthuman Future For being the complex creatures we are, it’s almost unsettling to be described in this way. Despite having a concrete set of […] Continue reading

Posted in agency, human genome project, Posthuman | Comments Off on A Forced Hand

“Servants with Internal Combustion Engines”

Dehumanization seems to be a common motif throughout dystopian novels, from Never Let Me Go’s clone treatments to Oryx and Crake‘s genetic enhancements, and Antic Hay is no exception.  Dan Fang delves deeper into this topic in the following blog post, presenting the strange chimeric inclinations of the citizens of Antic Hay, and how that relates […] Continue reading

Posted in 19th Century, 20th Century, Antic Hay, Eugenics, genetic engineering, JBS Haldane, mechanical servant, object, Posthuman, progress, Science Fiction, scientific advancement, Susan Squier | Comments Off on “Servants with Internal Combustion Engines”

This is It

I’m in the midst of E. O. Wilson’s Consilience: the Unity of Knowledge, preparing for my long-procrastinated research paper, when I stumble across the following passage Wilson quotes from Nicolas de Condorcet (a French 18th century Enlightenment philosopher): “‘How consoling for the philosopher who laments the errors, the crimes, the injustices which still pollute the […] Continue reading

Posted in Churchill, Cloning, Condorcet, consilience, E. O. WIlson, Ethics of science, Eugenics, Future, genetic engineering, Posthuman, Stem cell research | Comments Off on This is It