Category Archives: privacy

Privacy Is a Right, Not a Privilege 

I take issue with the way this debate is often framed: privacy versus security. It’s misleading to suggest that privacy is directly opposed to security. A more apt name would be privacy versus surveillance. My point in these semantics is that, even given a wide latitude to monitor the people of this country, government surveillance […] Continue reading

Posted in Constitution, privacy, security, Student Posts, surveillance | Comments Off on Privacy Is a Right, Not a Privilege 

Is there a middle ground?

The topic for this debate is crucial because it is so real within our lives. Since the rise of the truth in the summer of 2013, more and more people have become concerned with their own privacy, while many others ponder at what the balance should be. As part of the jury, the main thing […] Continue reading

Posted in middle ground, privacy, Student Posts, surveillance | Comments Off on Is there a middle ground?

The Importances of Both Stances

As a note-taker, I am a neutral person who simply wants to make sure that the most important aspects of the debate are discussed. With that being said, I have two questions. Has there been a period in history where something similar to this has happened and has gone very badly or extremely well? Exactly […] Continue reading

Posted in privacy, Rights, Student Posts, surveillance | Comments Off on The Importances of Both Stances

Trusting the Trade-Off

It is important to look at surveillance in the correct way, as an inanimate idea. Surveillance is but a tool used by entities in order to collect data about whoever is being surveilled. Thus a mistrust of surveillance lies fundamentally in the mistrust of authority and the powers delegated to it. My first primary argument […] Continue reading

Posted in government surveillance, privacy, society, Student Posts | Comments Off on Trusting the Trade-Off

Why Privacy is Needed

The US Government should not be given wide latitude to use electronic surveillance on its citizens. The government cites national security as the reasoning behind surveillance, but often times, national surveillance is not even effective in keeping the country safe or preventing terrorist attacks. In 2013, the President’s Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies […] Continue reading

Posted in debate, Government, privacy, Student Posts | Comments Off on Why Privacy is Needed

Criteria For Jury

I plan on evaluating the arguments based on a couple criterion. First, the relevance of the argument. Is the argument relevant to the average American or the argument directed towards a specific to a demographic? The relevance of the argument will be something I factor in heavily towards my decision. If the argument being made […] Continue reading

Posted in government surveillance, privacy, Student Posts, surveillance | Comments Off on Criteria For Jury

Notes from a Notetaker

To start off, I’ll be taking notes on every argument that is made. Good or bad, sensible or not, I’ll write it down. It will be up to the jurors to pick through this information, deciding which arguments are the strongest, most factual, and most convincing. That being said, there are some aspects of this […] Continue reading

Posted in debate, legislation, notetaking, privacy, security, Student Posts, surveillance | Comments Off on Notes from a Notetaker

Privacy Makes Sense

I have never needed much persuading when it came to believing in the privacy argument, as it actually makes a lot of sense. However, I can see how someone could be tempted to be in favor of surveillance if they did not understand the meaning of privacy. As Snowden has noted several times throughout his […] Continue reading

Posted in NSA, privacy, Snowden, Student Posts, surveillance | Comments Off on Privacy Makes Sense

The Price We (Force Others to) Pay

In the episode of Leading Lines, one point that Professor Gilliard brought up was that of how privacy infringements in the United States can have consequences that transcend national borders. The example provided: the oppression of Uyghurs in China. At one point in the episode, Professor Gilliard mentions how FaceApp, an app available to American […] Continue reading

Posted in LeadingLines, privacy, Student Posts, surveillance | Comments Off on The Price We (Force Others to) Pay

Picture Privacy

At around the 16th minute in the podcast, Professor Bruff brings up the FaceApp. The FaceApp was a smartphone application in which users uploaded photos and the app modified them in creative ways. It was later discovered that FaceApp was taking the data of the faces and potentially storing it in some servers. With an […] Continue reading

Posted in data mining, privacy, smartphone, Student Posts | Comments Off on Picture Privacy