Category Archives: revolution

Urizen, The Twice Weeped

Urizen weeps twice in The Song of Los: once near the end of “Africa,” and once at the end of “Asia.” In “Africa,” Urizen weeps for his mission is nearing completion. In “Asia,” Urizen weeps for his mission is nearing failure. In “Africa,” it is said that a new philosophy of the world is approaching. […] Continue reading

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Like-minded: Blake and Paine

Blake calls Paine a better Christian than the Bishop, but does not clarify what type of Christian he is referring to. What he means to say about him may vary depending on the connotation of being a Christian. In An Apology for the Bible, Blake says, “There is a vast difference between an accident brought […] Continue reading

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Newton’s Revolution

Enitharmon sleeps for 1800 years, only to be awoken by Newton’s blowing of the trump. In order to understand Newton’s role in this scene, we must first understand Enitharmon’s slumber. Enitharmon’s slumber begins with the birth of Christ and ends 1800 years later, at the beginning of the French Revolution. Also, her slumber is highly […] Continue reading

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Newton and the Creative Awakening

Before addressing the trump that awakes Enitharmon, we must first understand the significance of the slumber.  At this point in our study of Blake we are very familiar with his opposition of repetitive action, leaving individuals to thoughtlessly follow a predetermined pattern.  Within this framework, Enitharmon’s “slumber” represents her enslavement in the dull round and […] Continue reading

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Seemingly Never-Ending Chaos; or, Blake the Anarchist?

In class on Wednesday, I had difficultly reconciling the apocalyptic revolution depicted in “A Song of Liberty” with its abrupt, triumphant ending. The poem’s allusions to the Book of Revelation notwithstanding, “Empire is no more! and now the lion & the wolf shall cease” is a very simplistic resolution to the violence, conflict and chaos of […] Continue reading

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Idea map of Blake’s Politics

Today in class students have made some progress in understanding Blake’s political views in the context of the 1790s.  We concluded that Blake does not fit the political categories of “Left” and “Right,” problematizing this contrary itself, and adopts the biblical language of apocalypse/the Second coming to articulate his utopian vision while deviating from the standard […] Continue reading

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Blake, Moravianism, and Thomas Paine: Expanding on Anna’s Previous Argument

For this particular post, I want to elaborate on Anna’s post from last week. In it, she discusses Blake’s use of Moravian themes in the last Memorable Fancy. Anna’s post can be found here: http://williamblakeandenlightenmentmedia.wordpress.com/2012/02/17/blake-zinzendorf-nuns-et-al/ Anna claims that in this Memorable Fancy, “we see a typical motif of Blake’s work by connecting obedience to restricting […] Continue reading

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Blake and Paine: Devils or Inspired Men?

In his marginal comments to Watson’s An Apology for the Bible, Blake considers Paine’s secular enlightenment assault on revealed religion to be the work of “either a Devil or an Inspired Man” (456).  He also notes that “Paine is a better Christian than the Bishop” (460).  For next Wednesday (10/2), write a post that reflects on […] Continue reading

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