Category Archives: sexuality

Ololon’s Sexual Annihilation Through Milton

Comparing Blake’s Milton’s self-annihilation in Book one to Ololon’s self-annihilation in Book Two, Milton’s process refers to the fragility of humanity and the power within the reconciliation of female perceptions; whereas Ololon’s self-annihilation refers to the loss of her virginity–loss of institutionalized female oppression. In Book two, Ololon is a virgin seeking to figure out […] Continue reading

Posted in institutions, Milton, Ololon, revelation, Self-annihilation, sexuality, The Last Judgment (11/6-11/13), virginity | Comments Off on Ololon’s Sexual Annihilation Through Milton

A Dream of Desire Paints Reality of Repression

Blake’s illustration of Enitharmon’s eighteen hundred year-old slumber described as a “female dream,” can be analyzed through the picking apart of what her dream was actually about, the context to which surrounds her dream, as well as the symbolism behind Enitharmon’s name/ identity. When looking up her name’s meaning, Enitharmon is defined as the “source […] Continue reading

Posted in Enitharmon, repression, sexuality, spiritual beauty, The Flames of Orc (10/23) | Comments Off on A Dream of Desire Paints Reality of Repression

To Allow One’s Sleep, Is to Allow One’s Dream

When reading “Little Girl Lost,” by William Blake, the first immediate difference that I noticed was the difference in detail, length of the poem, and specificity of imagery. “The Little Girl Lost” begins with two stanzas that appear to be describing a vision- a moment of clarity where one is able to reflect and shift […] Continue reading

Posted in Experience, Earth, and Adulthood (9/18), life, Little Girl Lost, sexuality, Songs of Innocence and Experience, the mind | Comments Off on To Allow One’s Sleep, Is to Allow One’s Dream

Urizen weeps because he can’t bear to touch himself

Milton wants to celebrate self-love through the journey of sexual liberation, breaking away from the Urizen state of mind that “dares to mock with the aspersion of Madness/Cast on the Inspired, by the tame high finisher of paltry Blots” (202). The madness of course being the image offered through plate 47: two men–one enjoys the […] Continue reading

Posted in contraries, Los, masturbation, negation, sexuality, The Last Judgment (4/4-4/11), Urizen, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Urizen weeps because he can’t bear to touch himself

Pulsing Head & Deranged Thoughts: I don’t know what I just wrote.

By examining the engraved images of what is clearly a depiction of a man performing oral sex towards another man is actually an engraving that is supposed to portray Blake’s encounter with Los (further explained in the footnotes). By taking a closer look at the detail of both images, both of the men are presented […] Continue reading

Posted in contrary, Imagination, liberation, Los, masterbation, sexuality, The Last Judgment (4/4-4/11) | Comments Off on Pulsing Head & Deranged Thoughts: I don’t know what I just wrote.

Woman’s Power: Chastity, Seduction, & Flirtation

Enitharmon’s eighteen-hundred-year-old slumber is described as the “female dream” because it epitomizes all that Enitharmon wanted. As described in S. Foster Damon’s A Blake Dictionary, Enitharmon is a free woman, and hopes to use her freedom and indoctrinate man with the belief that woman have more power (Damon 132a). To exert her dominance and power […] Continue reading

Posted in feminism, power, sex, sexuality, The Flames of Orc (3/14), women | Comments Off on Woman’s Power: Chastity, Seduction, & Flirtation

Issac Newton: Enitharmon’s Loud Alarm Clock

Although Enitharmon is this embodiment of “spiritual beauty”, Blake uses her character in Europe a Prophecy to represent the idea of female domination, as well as the limitation of women exploring their sexuality, preventing them from reaching the imaginative. Enitharmon’s character is a representation of humanity’s ability to flourish, but does not through the mode of […] Continue reading

Posted in " Enlightenment Period, Enitharmon, joy, nets, Religion, Scientific Revolution, sexuality, The Flames of Orc (3/14), William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Issac Newton: Enitharmon’s Loud Alarm Clock

Why so many “Moravian” animals?

This post is a response to the previous post’s fourth question,  ”Does the line ‘The Tigers couch upon the prey & suck the ruddy tide’ (Europe 18/15:7; page 106) allude to a Moravian view of Christianity or, literally, to images of fearful tigers in other Blake poems (such as ‘The Tyger’ for instance)?” Firstly, why […] Continue reading

Posted in "The Tyger, Europe, Milton, sexuality, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, The Shifting Times, Urizen's Tears (10/23) | Comments Off on Why so many “Moravian” animals?

Interpreting Rape in Blake’s A Vision: A Provisional Reading

We discussed in class today Blake’s controversial representation of female rape in the “Argument” to Visions of the Daughters of Albion.  Just because we read Blake retrospectively as a “genius” does not mean we should let him off the hook for his sexist representation of female rape:  Oothoon plucks “Leutha’s flower,” asserted her feminine sexual identity by […] Continue reading

Posted in Empire vs. Revolution (10/2), feminism, gender, Mary Wollstonecraft, Moravianism, rape, sexuality, Visions of the Daughters of Albion | Comments Off on Interpreting Rape in Blake’s A Vision: A Provisional Reading

Sex, Religion, and Poetic Vision

For next Wednesday (9/25), students will write posts as comments to one of my former students: http://williamblakeandenlightenmentmedia.wordpress.com/2012/02/17/blake-zinzendorf-nuns-et-al/ Help this student develop a coherent interpretation by providing a close reading of a passage from Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell that, in your view, has strong Moravian images, themes, and overtones.  You are also free to respond […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Christ and the Body (9/25), Moravian Church, Moravianism, Moravians, sexuality, the body | Comments Off on Sex, Religion, and Poetic Vision