Category Archives: SF

Blood Lines – Graphic Fiction about Genetic Enhancement

This collaborative project from 2008 features the artwork of Anna Musun-Miller and the creative narrative by Matt Walker, both former Vanderbilt students in an early iteration of this class. http://bloodlines.comicgenesis.com/d/20080418.html Continue reading

Posted in Class Projects, Comics, coming of age, genetic engineering, Genetic enhancement, genetics, Girlhood, Graphic novel, Precocious children, SF | Comments Off on Blood Lines – Graphic Fiction about Genetic Enhancement

The Memefication of Academia

It’s impossible to be a citizen of the 21st century without being somewhat familiar with the ubiquitous, ever-changing phenomenon of “Internet culture”. My generation never even knew a time without the Internet. Every day of our lives, we consume thousands of bite-sized chunks of micro-content from our smartphone screens designed to grab our attention and […] Continue reading

Posted in academics, Funny, humanities, internet culture, meme, memes, SF, teaching, technology, the internet | Comments Off on The Memefication of Academia

Empathy or Pity: Racialization and Alienation in Sci-Fi

When reading Haggard’s “She,” I came across a common trope that has bothered me for some time. The novel depicts the adventures of the two men as they travel through Africa with the protection of British Imperialism. Although the novel’s narrator describes Vincey as an infallibly beautiful Greek god, Holly’s description focuses on the alienness […] Continue reading

Posted in androids, Blade Runner, Racialization, SF, She | Comments Off on Empathy or Pity: Racialization and Alienation in Sci-Fi

Confessions of a Librarian’s Daughter

I can’t stand when people watch a movie before they read the book. There. I said it. Even back in fourth grade when a film adaptation of Jeff Kinney’s renowned Diary of a Wimpy Kid hit theaters, I was appalled by my young cohort watching in awe from front row seats, so mindless of the […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Atwood, dystopia, Fiction, Films, hulu, Margaret Atwood, Science Fiction, SF, sf movies, The Handmaid's Tale | Comments Off on Confessions of a Librarian’s Daughter

Tech, Parents, and Identity

When I learned how Mary Shelly lost her children before she wrote Frankenstein and introduced Frankenstein’s monster, I strangely felt an urge to make a comparison right away between the parent-child relationship and the human-robot relationship. Frankenstein created the “monster” out of loneliness and some latent psychological need to prove himself. You hear people talking […] Continue reading

Posted in SF | Comments Off on Tech, Parents, and Identity

Do We Really Want Academic Disciplines?

I have STEM-majored friends explicitly declare that they don’t enjoy writing or reading and thus do their best to stay away from Humanity and Social Science courses. I also have friends who major in a Humanity subject and claim to hate at Math. In addition, many of them also disidentify themselves from a particular STEM […] Continue reading

Posted in SF | Comments Off on Do We Really Want Academic Disciplines?

Frankenstein and the War on Drugs

Many people proclaim that “drugs are bad” but is outlawing them creating more evil than leaving them legal? According to History.com, “The term ‘organized crime’ didn’t really exist in the United States before Prohibition.” During Prohibition, the mob was in charge of widescale distribution of alcohol, and in the 21st century, as a result of […] Continue reading

Posted in Frankenstein, SF, War on Drugs | Comments Off on Frankenstein and the War on Drugs

CRISPR, Cloning, and Self Preservation: How SF Handles Morale

Cloning is my favorite thing ever. Okay, let me rephrase. Studying the sociological and scientific impacts of cloning is one of my favorite intellectual ventures (second only to my recent research on the Oxford comma). In high school, I even had the opportunity three times to hear renowned Harvard-alum Sam Rhine lecture at his annual […] Continue reading

Posted in clone, Cloning, CRISPR, Frankenstein, genetic ethics, genetic modification, genetics, Mary Shelley, organ donation, Science Fiction, SF | Comments Off on CRISPR, Cloning, and Self Preservation: How SF Handles Morale

She Won’t Read That

I don’t read or watch science fiction, if I can help it. My favorite Star Wars movie is the third one (not counting the prequels) because the Ewoks are cute. I tried to read Douglas Adams’ The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and made it less than thirty pages. My eyes could barely keep themselves open during Blade Runner. I always […] Continue reading

Posted in Frankenstein, gender, jane austen, SF, Star Wars | Comments Off on She Won’t Read That

The Proto-Eugenic culture of a Jane Austen Novel

The Nazi movement may have made Eugenics famous, but it existed long before the 1930’s. Eugenics is formally defined by Meriam Webster as “the practice or advocacy of controlled selective breeding of human populations (as by sterilization) to improve the population’s genetic composition.” Sir Francis Galton coined the term in 1883, but this was just […] Continue reading

Posted in Eugenics, jane austen, proto-eugenics, SF | Comments Off on The Proto-Eugenic culture of a Jane Austen Novel