Category Archives: Shakespeare

Was there a real life Dracula?

The past few blogs posted have been about Dracula and Vampires and in this blog I am continuing the subject matter, but I want to bring attention to the history of Dracula. My first encounter with Vampires was with the infamous Twilight Saga, but my first encounter with an adaptation of the character Dracula, that […] Continue reading

Posted in Authors, bram stoker, disney, dracula, Fiction, Films, history, Hotel transylvania, SF, Shakespeare, Stoker, twilight, Vlad the impaler | Comments Off on Was there a real life Dracula?

Podcast Issues: Manuvering Through Describing the Topic of Stenography.

The podcast, Something Out of Nothing, discussed theories that believe that Shakespeare did not any of his sonnets, poems, or even plays. The speaker dives into the presence of cryptography in a lot of Shakespeare’s writing; the speaker gathered information about a unique cipher that utilized a substitute key and a form of stenography to […] Continue reading

Posted in Bilieral cipher, francis bacon, podcast, Shakespeare, Stenography, Student Posts | Comments Off on Podcast Issues: Manuvering Through Describing the Topic of Stenography.

“Oh brave new world that has such people in it!”

It would take quite a long time for me to simply list every reference to Shakespeare in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, let alone analyze the significance of them. Honestly I don’t think I would even be able to find all of them, even with a re-reading of the book. Over the course of the […] Continue reading

Posted in Brave New World, Fiction, gender, Huxley, Othello, SF, Shakespeare, The Tempest, VUTheatre | Comments Off on “Oh brave new world that has such people in it!”

Naming the Moons

For my mother’s 50th birthday, we bought her a star. Though arbitrary, I remember the immense amount of pressure that I felt when I was trying to give the star a name, knowing that (at least in our household) I was participating in the excavation of the final frontier, putting a little mark in my … More Naming the MoonsContinue reading Continue reading

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“O, swear not by the moon…”

Johannes Kepler made important contributions to astronomy through his discovery that planetary orbits are ellipses. Kepler came to this conclusion after several years of painstaking effort trying to make sense of all the observations of his former master Brahe. Kepler also proposed three laws of planetary motion as a summary of his findings. Kepler was […] Continue reading Continue reading

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Historical Astronomers in Context

Galileo Galilei: 2/15/1564- 1/8/1642 Brief Profile Galilei is known as the “father of science” as well as the “father of modern physics”. He discovered the different phases of Venus via a telescope and also discovered for moons that orbited around Jupiter. Galilei also spent time studying the Sun, in particular he looked at sunspots and […] Continue reading Continue reading

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The Meaning of Words: Dystopias, Utopias and the Lingusitic

As lovers of literature, we are no strangers to the world of language and expression. But what happens when a society is built upon the tenant that the words not only don’t exist, but carry no meaning? Erin Pellarin explores the meanings words can have on society and personal feeling, comparing John’s repertoire of Shakespearean […] Continue reading

Posted in Brave New World, culture, dystopia, Huxley, linguistics, meaning-making, Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, Science and humanities, Shakespeare, words | Comments Off on The Meaning of Words: Dystopias, Utopias and the Lingusitic