Category Archives: Sir Joshua Reynolds

Blake’s Encryption

To understand Blakes message, “Israel delivered from Egypt is Art delivered from Nature & Imitation,” one must take into considerations Reynolds perspective on the matter. Reynolds believes that “a mere copier of nature can never produce anything great… instead of endeavoring to amuse mankind with the minute neatness of his imitations, he must endeavor to […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Blake's philosophy of art (9/4), politics, Religion, Sir Joshua Reynolds, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Blake’s Encryption

Life Imitates Life

In “The Discourses of Art,” Sir Joshua Reynold writes, “a mere copier of nature can never produce anything great,” also adding that “instead of endeavoring to amuse mankind with the minute neatness of his imitations, he must endeavor to improve by the grandeur of his ideas” (41-42). His take on art reflects his strong ideology […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Blake, Blake's philosophy of art (9/4), divinity, Imitation, life, Sir Joshua Reynolds | Comments Off on Life Imitates Life

Poetic Genius: The Artistic Exodus

William Blake’s inscription in “The Laocoon” is used to differentiate his liberating definition of art from Sir Joshua Reynolds. The analogy is a biblical reference to when the Israelites escaped their servitude to the Egyptians. Blake uses this context to call attention to the artificiality of the Nature that Reynolds views as the principle that […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Blake's philosophy of art (9/4), Poetic Genius, Sir Joshua Reynolds, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Poetic Genius: The Artistic Exodus

The Necessity of God in Our Being

In the “Discourses on Art” by Sir Joshua Reynolds, he describes the process the Artist must experience to aspire the Ideal Beauty and its purpose. The Painter must examine the forms in nature continuously, until the artist has an idea of the central form. After comprehending the central form, the Painter must understand a variety […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Blake's philosophy of art (9/4), Sir Joshua Reynolds, William Blake | Comments Off on The Necessity of God in Our Being

Truths and Ideals

In Sir Joshua Reynold’s analysis in his work “The Discourses of Art,” he proposes that “a mere copier of nature can never produce anything great,” implying that a true artistic genius must “[captivate] the imagination” through their own accord only (41-42). The graffiti inscribed on William Blake’s “The Lacoon” echoes his own stance on the […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Blake's philosophy of art (9/4), ideals, politics, Religion, Sir Joshua Reynolds, truth, William Blake | Comments Off on Truths and Ideals

We have diff definitions of Genius -Blake

“As none by travelling over known lands can find out the unknown, So from already acquired knowledge Man could not acquire more. Therefore an universal Poetic Genius already exists.” -Blake Blake’s perspective on Genius and of art seems to be a very natural one -one that does not require higher forms of schooling.  Perhaps is […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Blake, Blake's philosophy of art (8/28), politics, Religion, Sir Joshua Reynolds, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on We have diff definitions of Genius -Blake

There are no rules to the genius

Sir Joshua Reynolds argues in Discourse III, “could we teach taste or genius by rules, they would be no longer taste and genius” (44). Which is to say that there is an unnatural, innate power of “taste” and “genius” that cannot be taught–or shouldn’t. That seems to debunk the whole idea of mentor and mentee relationships, […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Blake's philosophy of art (8/28), Genius, Imitation, nature, perception, Sir Joshua Reynolds, teaching, William Blake | Comments Off on There are no rules to the genius

Unshackled Chains

“I will free from your oppression and will rescue you from your slavery in Egypt” Exodus 6:6 William Blake’s analogy relies on the biblical context that Israel was delivered to freedom from the oppressive enslaving grip of Egypt. The second half of the encryption in Blake’s “The Lagoon” compares then art being delivered from something […] Continue reading

Posted in art, artistic expression, Blake's philosophy of art (8/28), Sir Joshua Reynolds, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Unshackled Chains

Satirizing Art, Religion, and Politics

Blake’s inscription, “Israel delivered from Egypt is Art delivered from Nature & Imitation,” is just one of many nonsensical phrases scrawled onto “The Laocoon.” When examined in the context of Reynolds’ Discourse of Art, it becomes clear that Blake is using “The Laocoon” to satirize Reynolds. In Discourse of Art, Reynolds claims “a mere copier […] Continue reading

Posted in politics, Satire, Sir Joshua Reynolds, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Satirizing Art, Religion, and Politics

Defining the Poetic Genius

In Blake’s “The Lacoon,” the graffiti artist scrawls on the lower left margin of the image, “Israel deliverd from Egypt is Art deliverd from Nature & Imitation” (352). What does this cryptic analogy imply about Blake’s attitude toward art’s political and religious dimension, especially in the context of his scornful reaction to Sir Joshua Reynold’s […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Blake's philosophy of art (9/4), Sir Joshua Reynolds, The Laocoon | Comments Off on Defining the Poetic Genius