Category Archives: subjectivity

On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

***This post contains spoilers!  If you are reading this, and you haven’t finished Oryx and Crake, step away from the computer and get back to it!*** I read Oryx and Crake primarily as a novel of trauma, extending past the genocidal crescendo of… Continue reading

Posted in Atwood, biomedicine, biopolitics, disillusion, dystopia, ethics, gender, meaning-making, narrative, narrative structure, Novelists, Oryx and Crake, Science Fiction, subjectivity | Comments Off on On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

Searching for MaddEve: Bare Life, Homo Sacer, and the Problem of Atwood’s Oryx

The labs and factory farms of Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake present us with a vertible zoo of zoē ─ a menagerie of bioforms that embody Giorgio Agamben’s concept of “bare life.” During his tour of Watson-Crick’s NeoAgriculturals wing, Continue reading

Posted in Agamben, Atwood, Margaret, bare life, biopolitics, Bride of Frankenstein, ChickieNobs, Gender studies, Homo Sacer, Jimmy, MaddAdam, MaddEve, Oryx and Crake, Science Fiction, Sex trafficking, Snowman, subjectivity | Comments Off on Searching for MaddEve: Bare Life, Homo Sacer, and the Problem of Atwood’s Oryx

Caged in Desire, or How to Read an Unreliable Narrator: Anxiety, Projection, and Crushes in Henry James’s In the Cage

I’d like to open this post with some mood music: There we go.  That sets the stage nicely. In other words, In the Cage is a stomach-turning read for any fantasy-prone person (re: most of us) who has ever had an unrequited crush.  Let’s th… Continue reading

Posted in "victorian literature, 19th Century, disillusion, Freud, Gender studies, Henry James, humanities, In the Cage, mechanical servant, narrative, narrative structure, Novelists, subjectivity | Comments Off on Caged in Desire, or How to Read an Unreliable Narrator: Anxiety, Projection, and Crushes in Henry James’s In the Cage

Objectivity, and Other Myths We Tell Ourselves

I come to my literature degree still carrying the baggage of having worked in a hospital operating room for a long time. Maybe it is not surprising to say that I have left filled with images and stories, and I am still trying to find a way of articulat… Continue reading

Posted in 20th Century, biomedicine, history of science, Lorraine Daston, meaning-making, objectivity, Peter Galison, subjectivity, Visuality | Comments Off on Objectivity, and Other Myths We Tell Ourselves

Objectivity and the Persona of the Artist

One of the recurrent images considered in Daston and Galison’s book Objectivity is that of the artist in contrast with the scientist. The most extensive discussion of this relation comes in chapter two, where generally in the eighteenth century, “t… Continue reading

Posted in artists, Cognitive Studies, Enlightenment, history of science, intuition, modernism, nineteenth century, objectivity, reason, Scientists, Selfhood, sensation, subjectivity, Visuality | Comments Off on Objectivity and the Persona of the Artist

The Perfect Type

What is “perfect?” You can cite dictionary definitions, but in the end those are essentially impossible ideals to obtain. “Perfection” as we know it is almost a purely theoretical concept, used mostly as emphasis. But Dan Fang discusses perfection in the context of scientific endeavour; what is considered a “perfect” organism, so that it is […] Continue reading

Posted in archetype, Brave New World, dystopia, Eugenics, Lorraine Daston, objectivity, perfection, Peter Galison, repetition, subjectivity, type | Comments Off on The Perfect Type