Category Archives: technoscience

When You Stare Into the Uncanny Valley, the Uncanny Valley Also Stares Into You: Posthuman Narratives in The Windup Girl

Like my dear colleague A.M. Lehr below, I also couldn’t help but make the comparison between Paolo Bacigaluipi’s The Windup Girl and E.T.A. Hoffman’s The Sandman… Possibly because of the “uncanny” resemblance in the … Continue reading

Posted in biopolitics, eta hoffman, Gender studies, jacques offenbach, narrative, Novelists, Paolo Bacigalupi, post-human, Science Fiction, technoscience, the sandman, The Windup Girl, uncanny, uncanny valley | Comments Off on When You Stare Into the Uncanny Valley, the Uncanny Valley Also Stares Into You: Posthuman Narratives in The Windup Girl

Creating Nanoworlds: Fear and Technology in Spin

Perusing a robotics installation at the Museum of Science in Boston, MA this weekend, I came across a display on RoboBees. These fascinating micro-robots are technological replacements for diminishing honeybee colonies, created to supplement our most i… Continue reading

Posted in Boston Museum of Science, Charles Wilson, Hypotheticals, nanobots, nanoculture, RoboBees, Science Fiction, Spin, technoscience, von Neumann ecology | Comments Off on Creating Nanoworlds: Fear and Technology in Spin

Nanotechnology and the NanoNarrative: Is Small the New Big?

Brooks Landon’s essay, “Less is More: Much Less is Much More: The Insistent Allure of Nanotechnology in Science Fiction” in the anthology, Nanoculture begins with a true statement of storytelling if I’ve ever heard one: “Size has … Continue reading

Posted in Brooks Landon, culture, history of science, homunculus, nanonarrative, nanotechnology, narrative, science, Science Fiction, Structure of Scientific Revolutions, technology, technoscience, Thomas Kuhn, Visuality | Comments Off on Nanotechnology and the NanoNarrative: Is Small the New Big?

Education, Nanotechnology, and the Magic School Bus?: Rethinking the relationship between science and science-fiction

“Who, then, are the real ‘engineers of the future’?” -Colin Milbun, Nanovision In Nanovision, Colin Milburn explores the way in which scientific discourse and the generic conventions of science-fiction blur in the study of nanotechnology. Inde… Continue reading

Posted in Colin Milburn, education, humanities, Magic School Bus, N. Katherine Hayles, nanotechnology, Nanovision, popular science, science, Science Education, Science Fiction, technology, technoscience | Comments Off on Education, Nanotechnology, and the Magic School Bus?: Rethinking the relationship between science and science-fiction

“Big Things Have Small Beginnings”: Ridley Scott’s Prometheus (2012) on Nanotechnology

At first glance, nanotechnology (technology on an atomic or molecular scale) and hyperobjects (defined by Timothy Morton as “things that are massively distributed in time and space relative to humans”) may seem like two destinations for scientific … Continue reading

Posted in AI, Alien franchise, androids, big things have small beginnings, black goo, David, film, Hyperobjects, Jane Bennett, Lawrence of Arabia, Michael Fassbender, nanotechnology, Peter O'Toole, Prometheus, Ridley Scott, Science Fiction, technoscience, the singularity, Timothy Morton, vibrant matter | Comments Off on “Big Things Have Small Beginnings”: Ridley Scott’s Prometheus (2012) on Nanotechnology

Evolutionary Hunger Games: Reading Darwin in the Twenty-First Century

As a Victorianist with a primary interest in the natural sciences and a secondary interest in contemporary speculative fiction, my research and thinking is constantly plagued by the question: how can we use Darwin today? Darwin’s influence on the Vic… Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, Atwood, Margaret, charles darwin, Darwin, evolution, George Levine, Gillian Beer, Hunger Games, Science Fiction, Struggle for Existence, Suzanne Collins, technoscience, Variation | Comments Off on Evolutionary Hunger Games: Reading Darwin in the Twenty-First Century

Is It Really Alive? and other questions about electricity

We are all familiar with the swelling exclamation “It’s alive, it’s alive” spoken by Colin Clive in his famous 1931 depiction of Frankenstein, directed by James Whale. This scene has been so deeply drilled into our cultural psyc… Continue reading

Posted in creature, electricity, Frankenstein, Frankenstein electrocuted, lightening, Science Fiction, Shelley, Mary, technoscience, Victor Frankenstein | Comments Off on Is It Really Alive? and other questions about electricity

​”The Scientific Life” in Real Life: Steven Shapin and “Popular” Science

Killian C. Quigley draws a comparison between Steven Shapin’s The Scientific Life and Martin Robbins’s article “Scientists say…”, detailing the relationship between scientific progress and its popular perception. Robbins’s article focuses on the journalistic spread of misinformation, which can lead to misconceptions of science by the public. Meanwhile, Shapin’s purpose is to reevaluate the individual’s […] Continue reading

Posted in academia, consensus, Ethics of science, history of science, Martin Robbins, popular science, science journalism, sociology of science, Steven Shapin, technoscience, the diet industry, The Gu, The Guardian, the MMR scare | Comments Off on ​”The Scientific Life” in Real Life: Steven Shapin and “Popular” Science

Contrucido ergo sum

“I cut, therefore I am.” A play-on words of the famous phrase “Cogito Ergo Sum,” and an appropriate one for the continued discussion of test-tube food. This time, Killian C. Quigley draws sources from Donna Haraway’s Modest_Witness@Second_Millennium.FemaleMan©_Meets_Oncomouse™ and Tim Hayward’s “Would you eat lab-grown meat?” in order to illustrate how the question of how our […] Continue reading

Posted in butchery, butchery; Donna Haraway; technoscience; test-tube burger; Ian Sample; The Guardian; nature; the natural; food science; Mark Post; message board; the future of food; natural purity; posthumanism; narra, Chimeras, Donna Haraway, food science, genetic engineering, Ian Sample, Mark Post, message board, narrative, natural purity, nature, pastoralism, posthumanism, technoscience, test-tube burger, the future of food, The Guardian, the natural, Tim Hayward, trans | Comments Off on Contrucido ergo sum