Category Archives: The Island of Dr. Moreau

Suicide and the Sovereignty of the Individual in The Island of Doctor Moreau

In the interest of fostering some continuity between this week’s reading and our pending discussion of H.G. Wells, I am interested in Foucault’s discussion of suicide as a way in which the individual might “usurp the power of death” (139). In T… Continue reading

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De-Sensitizing the Operating Room: Normalizing the “Unnatural” in The Island of Dr. Moreau

I say I became habituated to the Beast People, that a thousand things that had seemed unnatural and repulsive speedily became natural and ordinary to me. (The Island of Dr. Moreau, End of Chapter 15) I used to consider myself a very squeamish person. T… Continue reading

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Flashing a Glimpse of the Underworld

At a crucial turning point in H. G. Wells’ The Time Machine (1895), the time traveler, having descended one of the Morlock wells “ill equipped” and “even without enough matches,” wishes he had brought, not a torch or a weapon, but a camera: Continue reading

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How the Five-Men Tasted Blood: Ghosts of the Medusa in The Island of Dr. Moreau

While the mad scientist and his beast hybrids have become enough of a well-worn trope to be ripe for parody (see an example from Archer at the end of this post), I was impressed by how fresh and truly disturbing H.G. Wells’s vision of scientific hubr… Continue reading

Posted in Archer, Beastfolk, Dr. Krieger, Gericault, H.G. Wells, Hobbes, Lewis Petrinovich, Life of Pi, maritime law, Raft of the Medusa, Science Fiction, survivor cannibalism, The Cannibal Within, The Island of Dr. Moreau, The Law, Wells, H. G., wreck of the Medusa | Comments Off on How the Five-Men Tasted Blood: Ghosts of the Medusa in The Island of Dr. Moreau

God and ethics in Dr. Moreau

As scientists push the boundaries of genetics, society faces ever more ethical questions.  Well before any of our modern ideas about genetics came about, however, there was H.G. Wells, who gave us a look at tampering with nature in his The Island of Dr. Moreau. The titular doctor, though not a geneticist, creates chimeras through extensive […] Continue reading

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