Category Archives: The Last Judgment (11/6-11/13)

Problems of Satirical Representation: Milton and the Female Muse

William Blake’s Milton “Book the First” is introduced with images of Beulah and her daughters. This reminded me of the image of Oothoon surrounded by both her tormented lover and rapist.  Milton’s emanations are for Blake the earthly contradictions beheld in the “heavens of Albion,” (148). Death and annihilation are central themes for Blake, but […] Continue reading

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The Eternal and Infinite Death

I tried to resist the Vortex and now I am caught. In Blake’s Milton A Poem Book 1, Milton seeks to prepare himself for judgement. Whether his preparation is the eternity of death or the infinite of the vortex, Judgement comes, and with it eternity. Milton speaks, “I will go down to self annihilation and eternal death, […] Continue reading

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Milton, Spectres, and Flowers

In William Blake’s Milton: Book the First, Blake critiques John Milton’s intents in Paradise Lost. Despite, his admiration for Milton, Blake believes that Milton’s idea that relegating revolutionary energy was diabolic. Instead, he thinks that was diabolic was Milton’s “selfhood” or self righteousness, to put in other terms. In Line 8-11 he states: The Eternal Great […] Continue reading

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Resurrection from Reason

The reason that Milton says that he needs to “go down to self annihilation and eternal death” is because there is some cleansing that comes from the destruction of the self. It is this cleansing that proves to bring people to a state of mind that is liberating from all the restraints placed on them. […] Continue reading

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A Bunch of Eternal Mumble Jumble

Although the first book of Milton A Poem read nothing but mumble jumble to me as I read it, I seemed to be aided by not only the Blake Dictionary, but also drawing from past discussions in class. I came to the conclusion that the reason why Milton feels he must “go down to self annihilation […] Continue reading

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Bounding the Poetic Genius

In plate 2 of William Blake’s “Milton: Book the First”, the oppressed poetic Genius is revealed within the renowned poet John Milton, author of Paradise Lost. Blake writes how the poetic Genius is called upon in Milton through various physical awareness, specifically focusing on tactile imagery (that of touch), to highlight this. Blake mentions how […] Continue reading

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Good and Evil

Milton needs to “go down to self annihilation and eternal death” because he is the “Poetic Genius” who protects “Divine Humanity” (The Prophetic Books of William Blake). This idea of being the protector of the people correlates with the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. According to the Bible, Jesus Christ died in order to save humanity […] Continue reading

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why’s satan trying to be god so bad?

Milton martyrs himself as the savior of his people, which is ironic because he doesn’t agree on the ideas of war or any type of heroic characteristic for that matter. However, he’s being forced into the eternal death because God is inactive in the fight against satan; he takes off his robe of promise, that […] Continue reading

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Where He Belongs

By now, I think we have figured out that Blake enjoys his “Genius” and that to retain his “Genius,” he must reside with Los in Hell. It seems that when Milton rose and claimed he was going to “Eternal Death.” He essentially means that he is abandoning the heavens. “Then Milton rose up from the […] Continue reading

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Blake’s Milton: the Quest for Self-Annihilation

For next Wednesday (4/4), students will answer the following question: Why does Milton need to “go down to self annihilation and eternal death”? (book 1, plate 15, line 22; page 162) Because this poem is so dense and confusing, I ask that students provide a close reading of ONE of the six passages listed below […] Continue reading

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