Category Archives: Thomas Paine

An Inspired Devil

When William Blake refers to Thomas Paine as ““either a Devil or an Inspired Man” in Watson’s Apology for a Bible, he is further accepting and emphasizing not only the potential genius in Evil itself, but also the necessity of a faith that is between Christianity and Satanism (456). He strongly displays these radical beliefs […] Continue reading

Posted in Empire vs. Revolution (10/16), evil, good, Religion, Thomas Paine | Comments Off on An Inspired Devil

Wolf in Knight’s Armor: Civility in “Holy Thursday”

The contrasting levels of power present harmoniously in “Holy Thursday” from Songs of Innocence, like the children, beadles, and God in St. John’s Cathedral, illustrates the exertion of false power Thomas Paine and William Blake’s Moravian beliefs rejected. This civility with which the scene in “Holy Thursday” is conducted with demonstrates the way  civility fosters social hierarchies and […] Continue reading

Posted in chivalry, civility, Empire vs. Revolution (10/16), Holy Thursday, innocence, The Rights of Man, Thomas Paine, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Wolf in Knight’s Armor: Civility in “Holy Thursday”

Religion and Politics

Blake engages with the French revolutionary debates in his “A Song of Liberty.” Thomas Paine, who also engages in those same debates, believes that “There never did, there never will, and there never can, exist a parliament, or any description of men, or any generation of men, in any country, possess of the right or […] Continue reading

Posted in Empire vs. Revolution (2/28), politics, Religion, Thomas Paine, William Blake | Comments Off on Religion and Politics

Liberté, égalité, fraternité

Blake’s marginalia deeming Paine “either a Devil or an Inspired Man” (456) is indicative of his admiration for Pain because throughout the works of Blake we see him develop the devil as a character that is calling for inquiry on a system that he is advised to not question. In The Marriage of Heaven and […] Continue reading

Posted in America, church, Empire vs. Revolution (2/28), Europe a Prophecy, monarchy, Republic, Thomas Paine, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Liberté, égalité, fraternité

The Pain of Will

Though William Blake is not anti-religious as Thomas Paine is, they both share a similar distaste for the church and state and how they operate (rule) society. In Thomas Paine’s “The Rights of Man Part 1”, he argues against the fallacy of his government: “what is government more than the management of the affairs of […] Continue reading

Posted in children, christianity, Empire vs. Revolution (2/28), Government, literature, poetry, politics, Religion, society, system, Thomas Paine, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on The Pain of Will

William Blake and Enlightenment Media 2018-02-27 22:16:13

So far, what we do know of Blake’s beliefs regarding Swedonborg and the Moravian Church in is that Swedonborg is a false proclaimer; that he claims to have realized certain beliefs before others have. “Now hear a plain fact: Swedonborg has not written one new truth:/ Now hear another: he has written all the old […] Continue reading

Posted in Blake, Empire vs. Revolution (2/28), French Revolution, Heaven and Hell, Thomas Paine, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on William Blake and Enlightenment Media 2018-02-27 22:16:13

Prophets against Empire

In his marginal comments to Watson’s An Apology for the Bible, Blake considers Thomas Paine’s secular enlightenment assault on revealed religion to be the work of “either a Devil or an Inspired Man” (456).  He also notes that “Paine is a better Christian than the Bishop” (460).  For next Wednesday (2/28), write a post that reflects […] Continue reading

Posted in Empire vs. Revolution (2/28), French Revolution, politics, Thomas Paine | Comments Off on Prophets against Empire

Prophets against Empire

In his marginal comments to Watson’s An Apology for the Bible, Blake considers Thomas Paine’s secular enlightenment assault on revealed religion to be the work of “either a Devil or an Inspired Man” (456).  He also notes that “Paine is a better Christian than the Bishop” (460).  For next Wednesday (10/16), write a post that […] Continue reading

Posted in Empire vs. Revolution (10/16), French Revolution, politics, revolution, Thomas Paine | Comments Off on Prophets against Empire

Blake & Paine

For Edmund Burke, the French Revolution represented an inversion and usurpation of natural order (at the very least a dismantling of the benign illusions thereof), a loss of the restraints and checks on mankind’s more bestial drives. However, for Blake, it was genuinely apocalyptic—in the sense it offered revelation, the casting off of fetters and […] Continue reading

Posted in Edmund Burke, Empire vs. Revolution (10/2), French Revolution, Thomas Paine, William Blake | Comments Off on Blake & Paine

Blake, Moravianism, and Thomas Paine: Expanding on Anna’s Previous Argument

For this particular post, I want to elaborate on Anna’s post from last week. In it, she discusses Blake’s use of Moravian themes in the last Memorable Fancy. Anna’s post can be found here: http://williamblakeandenlightenmentmedia.wordpress.com/2012/02/17/blake-zinzendorf-nuns-et-al/ Anna claims that in this Memorable Fancy, “we see a typical motif of Blake’s work by connecting obedience to restricting […] Continue reading

Posted in devils, Empire vs. Revolution (10/2), liberty, Moravian Church, revolution, Satire, Thomas Paine | Comments Off on Blake, Moravianism, and Thomas Paine: Expanding on Anna’s Previous Argument