Category Archives: Turing Test

History Takes the Laugh Out of Many Things

Far from being a genre of pure imagination, Science Fiction is a category of writing insistently aware of the boundaries of reality. In The Paris Review, Ray Bradbury called it “the art of the possible, never the impossible.” Isaac Asimov characterized… Continue reading

Posted in Alternative history, Asimov, Biology, Bradbury, Clifford D. Simmak, Phillip K Dick, Quantum Mechanics, Steampunk, The City, Turing Test, Ubik, Victorian SF | Comments Off on History Takes the Laugh Out of Many Things

Her Brain Proved Wide Enough for My Sky

Usually, texts in which a male creator forms a feminine robot tend to fall into one of two categories. The first, (which I previously discussed here), are essentially sexbot stories – men creating programmable women to be ideal partners without any of … Continue reading

Posted in Ex Machina, Frankenstein, gender, Robert Powers, robots, SF love, Turing Test, uncanny valley | Comments Off on Her Brain Proved Wide Enough for My Sky

She Made Herself

In 8 AD, Pygmalion prays a statue to life to be his wife. In 1886, Ewald enlists a fictional Thomas Edison to create Hadaly, a romantic companion who would have the beauty of a human woman without the pesky spirit. In 2009’s (distressingly orientalist)… Continue reading

Posted in Bacigalupi, Chabon, Cynthia Ozick, eta hoffman, Ex Machina, Fantasy, gender, Golem, Marge Piercy, Michael Chabon, Ozick, Piercy, robots, SF, The Future Eve, The Windup Girl, Turing Test | Comments Off on She Made Herself

Ted Chiang AI Talk Highlights: Singularity?

In his talk last Monday here at Vanderbilt, Ted Chiang joined a panel to talk about the future of Artificial Intelligence. He spoke about what A.I. means for humanity, and contested the possibility of the singularity (a.k.a. the technology explosion that occurs when computers begin programming smarter computers, with those smarter computers programming even smarter […] Continue reading

Posted in AI, Chiang, Fiction, humanities, Procreation, robots, SF, Singularity, Turing Test | Comments Off on Ted Chiang AI Talk Highlights: Singularity?

Foreshadowing in “Ex Machina”

“Ex Machina” is a 2014 film in which programmer Caleb Smith, who works at a Google-like company, is not-so-randomly chosen for a private retreat at the CEO’s compound. The CEO—Nathan Bateman—lives alone, with the exception of a servant named Kyoko that doesn’t speak English and a humanoid robot named Ava. Caleb is brought to the […] Continue reading

Posted in AI, Artificial Intelligence, Ex Machina, Fiction, Films, gender, privacy, robot, robots, SF, Turing Test | Comments Off on Foreshadowing in “Ex Machina”

Something Old to Something New: From Bach to AI

Composers can spend their entire lives studying the music of deceased composers before them in order to find inspiration for their own compositions. They can then spend years drafting manuscript after manuscript before they finish their work. However, the process doesn’t end there. After music is composed, the composer still has to find musicians willing to […] Continue reading

Posted in Authors, music, SF, Turing Test | Comments Off on Something Old to Something New: From Bach to AI

A New Age of Artifice

In the fall of 2011, Duke University’s undergraduate literary journal published a rather unassuming poem entitled “For the Bristlecone Snag” (“The Archive”). To the journal’s poetry editors, the poem appeared to be a typical undergraduate work, comprised of several unfulfilled metaphors and awkward turns of phrase. What the editors did not know at the time of publication, however, was that this poem was not written by a human… Continue reading

Posted in art, Artificial Intelligence, Cognitive Computing, Eugene Goostman, Humanity, literature, Machine Learning, Sci-Fi, science, Science Fiction, SF, technology, Turing, Turing Test, Watson, writing | Comments Off on A New Age of Artifice