Category Archives: Visuality

Thoughts on Interdisciplinarity, Cognitive Science, and 19th-Century Aesthetics

Interdisciplinary is an at times seemingly vague buzzword invoked in academia. It is often used in general documents like Vanderbilt’s academic strategic plan. Recently, however, it has become a little less of an abstract concept for me. I have spent… Continue reading

Posted in 19th-century aesthetics, cognitive science, Cognitive Studies, Daniel Levin, disciplines, history of science, interdisciplinary, Levin Lab, perception, Vanderbilt University, visual perception, Visuality | Comments Off on Thoughts on Interdisciplinarity, Cognitive Science, and 19th-Century Aesthetics

Nanotechnology and the NanoNarrative: Is Small the New Big?

Brooks Landon’s essay, “Less is More: Much Less is Much More: The Insistent Allure of Nanotechnology in Science Fiction” in the anthology, Nanoculture begins with a true statement of storytelling if I’ve ever heard one: “Size has … Continue reading

Posted in Brooks Landon, culture, history of science, homunculus, nanonarrative, nanotechnology, narrative, science, Science Fiction, Structure of Scientific Revolutions, technology, technoscience, Thomas Kuhn, Visuality | Comments Off on Nanotechnology and the NanoNarrative: Is Small the New Big?

De-Sensitizing the Operating Room: Normalizing the “Unnatural” in The Island of Dr. Moreau

I say I became habituated to the Beast People, that a thousand things that had seemed unnatural and repulsive speedily became natural and ordinary to me. (The Island of Dr. Moreau, End of Chapter 15) I used to consider myself a very squeamish person. T… Continue reading

Posted in "victorian literature, 19th Century, 20th Century, biomedicine, biopolitics, disillusion, dystopia, ethics, Ethics of science, H.G. Wells, history of science, role of scientists, Science Fiction, technology, The Island of Dr. Moreau, Visuality | Comments Off on De-Sensitizing the Operating Room: Normalizing the “Unnatural” in The Island of Dr. Moreau

Telegraphic Realism and Modernist Aesthetics

Henry James’ style of writing in his short novel In the Cage at first seems nothing like the compressed, imagist ideals of Ezra Pound. But perhaps examining some of Pound’s essays, including one on James, in conjunction with Richard Menke’s exami… Continue reading

Posted in Ezra Pound, Henry James, Imagism, In the Cage, Interiority, James, Henry, modernism, Richard Menke, technology, Telegraphic Realism, Visuality | Comments Off on Telegraphic Realism and Modernist Aesthetics

Objectivity, and Other Myths We Tell Ourselves

I come to my literature degree still carrying the baggage of having worked in a hospital operating room for a long time. Maybe it is not surprising to say that I have left filled with images and stories, and I am still trying to find a way of articulat… Continue reading

Posted in 20th Century, biomedicine, history of science, Lorraine Daston, meaning-making, objectivity, Peter Galison, subjectivity, Visuality | Comments Off on Objectivity, and Other Myths We Tell Ourselves

Mounds of Venus, or What a Pile of Goddess Guts Can Teach Us About Objectivity

In their history of science tome, Objectivity (2010), Daston and Galison examine how the modern concept of objectivity emerged from the mid-nineteenth-century sciences. They argue that this ideal of objectivity requires “the suppression of some aspec… Continue reading

Posted in 19th Century, anatomical venus, erotic science, exquisite corpse, Gender studies, history of science, lady parts, Lorraine Daston, medical ethics, Peter Galison, torso explosion, Visuality | Comments Off on Mounds of Venus, or What a Pile of Goddess Guts Can Teach Us About Objectivity

Objectivity and the Persona of the Artist

One of the recurrent images considered in Daston and Galison’s book Objectivity is that of the artist in contrast with the scientist. The most extensive discussion of this relation comes in chapter two, where generally in the eighteenth century, “t… Continue reading

Posted in artists, Cognitive Studies, Enlightenment, history of science, intuition, modernism, nineteenth century, objectivity, reason, Scientists, Selfhood, sensation, subjectivity, Visuality | Comments Off on Objectivity and the Persona of the Artist