Category Archives: Wells, H. G.

Flashing a Glimpse of the Underworld

At a crucial turning point in H. G. Wells’ The Time Machine (1895), the time traveler, having descended one of the Morlock wells “ill equipped” and “even without enough matches,” wishes he had brought, not a torch or a weapon, but a camera: Continue reading

Posted in evolution, flash photography, H.G. Wells, history of science, Jacob Riis, Science Fiction, The Island of Dr. Moreau, The Time Machine, Wells, H. G. | Comments Off on Flashing a Glimpse of the Underworld

How the Five-Men Tasted Blood: Ghosts of the Medusa in The Island of Dr. Moreau

While the mad scientist and his beast hybrids have become enough of a well-worn trope to be ripe for parody (see an example from Archer at the end of this post), I was impressed by how fresh and truly disturbing H.G. Wells’s vision of scientific hubr… Continue reading

Posted in Archer, Beastfolk, Dr. Krieger, Gericault, H.G. Wells, Hobbes, Lewis Petrinovich, Life of Pi, maritime law, Raft of the Medusa, Science Fiction, survivor cannibalism, The Cannibal Within, The Island of Dr. Moreau, The Law, Wells, H. G., wreck of the Medusa | Comments Off on How the Five-Men Tasted Blood: Ghosts of the Medusa in The Island of Dr. Moreau