Category Archives: William Blake

Deconstructing Institutions

Thus, far we have read various passages of Blake’s works, noting interpretations and meaning of such works. Interestingly enough, Blake has presented his distaste in binaries either from ideologies like right &  wrong, just & unjust, female & male, etc. Including, radical ideas like getting rid of institutionalized ideologies the evade within our social spheres. […] Continue reading

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Wolf in Knight’s Armor: Civility in “Holy Thursday”

The contrasting levels of power present harmoniously in “Holy Thursday” from Songs of Innocence, like the children, beadles, and God in St. John’s Cathedral, illustrates the exertion of false power Thomas Paine and William Blake’s Moravian beliefs rejected. This civility with which the scene in “Holy Thursday” is conducted with demonstrates the way  civility fosters social hierarchies and […] Continue reading

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The Practicing of Herz-Lev

After reading, “Young William Blake and the Moravian Tradition of Visionary Art” by Marsha Schuchard, the Moravian influence in William Blake’s works are understandable. From Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, “The worship of God is. Honouring his gifts in other men each according to his genius. and loving the greatest men best, those who […] Continue reading

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Cursed Attributes of Humanity

In his compiled work Marriage of Heaven and Hell, William Blake conveys several unconventional ideas and concepts inspired by Moravian beliefs, including a heavy emphasis on the body and the soul. In the first of  four “A Memorable Fancy” passages, Blake writes about encounters with the infernal depths of Hell while collecting the Proverbs of […] Continue reading

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The Procreation and Rebirth of the Sinner

The Morovian teachings Blake was exposed to had an emphasized the production of knowledge, and in turn life, through bodily means. According to Marsha Keith Schuchard in “Young William Blake and the Moravian Tradition of Visionary Art,” Morovians believed “new souls [are] birthed [from] the gushing blood” of Jesus’ crucifixion wounds, since the phallic nails penetrate the […] Continue reading

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Meaning to Manson

Considering the many omitted lines from “Proverbs of Hell” in Manson’s reading, it suggests Manson’s interpretation of the poem centers in on personal experience and differences. During reading “Proverbs of Hell”, a few lines struck me. A few of those lines were, “A fool sees not the same tree that a wise man sees./ He whose […] Continue reading

Posted in independence, individuality, marilyn manson, Proverbs of Hell, Proverbs of Hell (9/25), responsibility, self-love, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Meaning to Manson

Meaning is Created through Opposites

“Prisons are built with stones of Law, Brothels with bricks of Religion.” The proverb compares the consequences of Law and Religion. In the first half, the stones are being compared to the Law. The stones that construct the prison is what physically prevents the prisoners from leaving. However, the Law is the abstraction that contains […] Continue reading

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Growing Knowledge

William Blake’s “Proverbs of Hell” aims to demonstrate the importance of questioning accepted social ideals, as it is the only manner by which new knowledge can be produced. One aphorism that especially stood out to me was the second line: “Drive your cart and your plow over the bones of the dead.” The tools in […] Continue reading

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Blake’s Encryption

To understand Blakes message, “Israel delivered from Egypt is Art delivered from Nature & Imitation,” one must take into considerations Reynolds perspective on the matter. Reynolds believes that “a mere copier of nature can never produce anything great… instead of endeavoring to amuse mankind with the minute neatness of his imitations, he must endeavor to […] Continue reading

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To Sulk Upon My Joyful Mother’s Breast

In William Blake’s “Infant Joy” within his compilation of Songs of Innocence, the jubilant speaker sings of joy in hopes that a newborn infant will find it in life, yet it is not made clear if the speaker is the mother or the baby themselves. In his companion piece “Infant Sorrow” found within his Songs […] Continue reading

Posted in birth, Experience, Earth, and Adulthood (9/18), ideals, Infant Sorrow, reality, truth, William Blake | Comments Off on To Sulk Upon My Joyful Mother’s Breast