Category Archives: William Blake

Self-Love

When observing the images of male-to-male oral sex, what can be assumed is that there is two figures, but another perspective could be that there is something else -something mystical taking place.  In other words, what I took from it is that while we see two figures -men- doing acts to one another it is […] Continue reading

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Cumming To Terms With You

Giving head is a process. Beyond just the physical act, male-to-male oral sex transports us into a different realm. A realm beyond, what William Blake calls “mental fight.” Self-annihilation, the arrival at true, honest, uncensored self-reflection is the apocalypse. What we do once we arrive at Eternity determines our resurrection. People have been dying, awaiting […] Continue reading

Posted in Eternity, oral sex, Self-annihilation, self-love, The Last Judgment (4/4-4/11), William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Cumming To Terms With You

Urizen weeps because he can’t bear to touch himself

Milton wants to celebrate self-love through the journey of sexual liberation, breaking away from the Urizen state of mind that “dares to mock with the aspersion of Madness/Cast on the Inspired, by the tame high finisher of paltry Blots” (202). The madness of course being the image offered through plate 47: two men–one enjoys the […] Continue reading

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Contemporaries Years Apart

In William Blake’s The Song of Los: Africa, Adam and Noah are an odd combination to put as contemporaries given that Adam is about 8 or so generations away from Adam acording to the bible (Adam father of Seth, Seth father of Enos, Enos father of Kenan, Kenan father of Malalel, Malalel father of Jared, Jared […] Continue reading

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The Reason He Cries

Urizen is ultimately weeping about the same thing: the emergence of Los, or, revolution of the peoples through the ashes of long forgotten imaginations. His rule over the world is coming to an end, which is why in “Africa”, he “gave it into the hands of Newton & Locke” (110); “it“ being the ideology of reason. […] Continue reading

Posted in Africa, Asia, literature, Locke, Los, Newton, tears, Urizen, Urizen's Tears (3/21), William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on The Reason He Cries

The Female Touch

Enitharmon, who it has been notioned to represent Marie Antoinette, is the embodiment of both the Womens’ force, while at the same time indicating that such a force is not a conducive one.  It is a rarity to have a woman in power, in any context, during this era; however, through Blake’s work, we see […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Design, erithorman, Europe a Prophecy, Orc, The Flames of Orc (3/14), William Blake | Comments Off on The Female Touch

From what Mythology is Europe A Prophecy derived?

Not to become a one-trick pony here, but in Europe a Prophecy, Blake’s mythopoeia becomes once again very Nordic. These apocalyptic prophecies bear close resemblance to Ragnarök, the apocalyptic prophecies of Norse Mythology. Because the Eddas of Medieval Norse people are incredibly difficult to read, I will be citing Neil Gaiman’s well researched, modernized 2017 edition: Norse Mythology […] Continue reading

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dreaming aint just for men

Enitharmon’s dream was gendered as female because of its connection to Los; hitherto, Europe was ruled and dictated by a man’s dream, hence: “eighteen hundred years: Man was a Dream!” (12/9, line 2, 101). The logic of reason, or the ideology understood through the character Urizen, had been the contemporary order of society. Therefore, by […] Continue reading

Posted in Dreams, Enitharmon, Los, The Flames of Orc (3/14), Urizen, William Blake, William Blake's reception, women | Comments Off on dreaming aint just for men

The Red Prophecy

William Blake’s Europe a Prophecy ends with an epic war in which Los and Orc prepare to fight: But terrible Orc, when he beheld the morning in the east Shot from the heights of Enitharmon; And in the vineyards of red France appear’d the light of his fury Orc is the embodiment of rebellion as opposed to […] Continue reading

Posted in America, Europe a Prophecy, France, French Revolution, Los, Orc, The Flames of Orc (3/14), Urizen, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on The Red Prophecy

Religion and Politics

Blake engages with the French revolutionary debates in his “A Song of Liberty.” Thomas Paine, who also engages in those same debates, believes that “There never did, there never will, and there never can, exist a parliament, or any description of men, or any generation of men, in any country, possess of the right or […] Continue reading

Posted in Empire vs. Revolution (2/28), politics, Religion, Thomas Paine, William Blake | Comments Off on Religion and Politics