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February 27-28: Pier Gabrielle Foreman

Posted by on Thursday, February 16, 2017 in Events, Workshops, Drop-in hours, News.

Invitational lecture and workshops with Dr. P. Gabrielle Foreman, founder of ColoredConventions.org

Monday, February 27, 11:15 am, Vanderbilt Center for Digital Humanities, 344 Buttrick Hall

Lunch & Discussion, “Digital Humanities Pedagogy”

Register in advance for this event.  Lunch will be provided.  

Monday, February 27, 3:30 pm, Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center Auditorium

Invitational Lecture, “Digital Organizing and Collective Recovery: Colored Conventions and the Long History of Black Activism”

Tuesday, February 28, 9:30 am, Vanderbilt Center for Digital Humanities, 344 Buttrick Hall

Graduate Student Workshop, “Developing and Promoting Diverse Scholarly Work in the Digital Humanities” 

Register in advance for this event. 

About the Speaker

Inauguration Symposium, Gabrielle Foreman talks on "Demands for Justice: Colored Conventions and the Power of Commitment".

P. Gabrielle Foreman is the Ned B. Allen Professor of English and Professor of History and Black American Studies at the University of Delaware. She has published extensively on issues of race, slavery and reform in the nineteenth century with a focus on the past’s continuing hold on the world we inhabit today. Foreman has a long-standing commitment to the intersection of digital technologies, race and public history. In the 1990s, she was part of a three person interdisciplinary that fully integrated digital technologies into first-year required courses at liberal arts colleges for the first time.

Foreman is the founding faculty director of the Colored Conventions Project, which since 2012 has made digitally available six decades of Black political organizing that overlapped with and was obscured by the abolitionist movement. The project has involved over 1000 students across the country in undergraduate research through its curriculum adopted by the Project’s national teaching partners while launching a transcription project recognized alongside those by the British Library and the Massachusetts Historical Society.

In addition to her invitational lecture on “Digital Organizing and Collective Recovery: Colored Conventions and the Long History of Black Activism,” Dr. Foreman will lead a lunch discussion on Digital Humanities Pedagogy and a workshop for graduate students on Developing and Promoting Diverse Scholarly Work in the Digital Humanities.

Events sponsored by The Center for Digital Humanities, Voices from Our America, The Curb Center, The Program in American Studies, The Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center, and the English Graduate Students Association.

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