Current Courses

Minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies

Some courses can count for the minor but are not listed in the catalog.  Hess will issue variances for those courses so that they count toward the minor.

This is a list of courses that can receive credit for the Minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies. If you identify a course that is not on the list, please contact Prof. Hess to see if it can qualify for the minor. Usually he will need to see the syllabus before granting a variance. Note: in some cases it is possible to count a B list course for the C list and vice-versa, so please contact Prof. Hess if you want to be considered for a variance.  Soc 3312, Soc 3316, and ENVS 4101 also count toward the major in Environmental Sociology. ENVS 4101 can be open to sophomores who have declared the major or minor and have taken other environmental courses. Some courses listed below may not appear in your degree audit for the ESS minor. If that happens, contact Prof. Hess.

Spring 2018

A List

EES 1030 Oceanography (Goodbred)

EES 1111 Antarctica (Morgan)

EES 1510 Dynamic Earth (Kelley)

EES 3220 Life Through Time (DeSantis)

EES 4650 Physics of the Climate System (Bennartz)

EES 4750 Sustainable System Science (Ayers)

ENVE 3610 Sustainable Development (Troxel)

 

B list

ENGL 3730 Literature and the Environment (Goddu

HART 2780: History of Western Urbanism (Robinson); will need variance from Hess

HIST 2129: Technology, Nature, and Power in Africa (Rijke-Epstein)

 

C list

PSCI 2205 Contemporary Political Theory (Ackerly); will need variance from Hess

Soc 3324 Environmental Inequality and Justice (Bandy)

Soc 3316 Business, Civil Society, and the Environment (Tzankova)

Soc 3321 Population and Society (Sana)

 

ENVS 4101 Capstone in Environmental and Sustainability Studies (Hess–open to minors in Env& Sust Studies and to majors in Sociology or Environmental Sociology)

 

Fall 2017

 

A List

BSCI 1103 The Green Earth (Benson)

BSCI 2238 Ecology (Da Silva Pinto Jorge)

CE 2120 Sustainable Design in Civil Engineering (Troxel)

EES 1030 Oceanography (Goodbred)

EES 1510 Dynamic Earth (Claiborne)

EES 2110 Global Climate Change (Gilligan)

EES 4820 Paleoecological Methods (DeSantis)

ENVE 4615 Environmental Assessments (Clarke)

 

B List

ENGL 3730 Literature and the Environment (Teukolsky)

HART 2150 East Asian Architecture and Gardens (Miller)

PHIL 1111 Green Cities (Bremer)

PHIL 3611 Environmental Philosophy (Wood)

 

C List

AMER 4000 Urban Geography and Planning (Fraser)

ANTH 2109 Food Politics in America (Conklin)

ANTH 2227 Food in the Ancient World (Guengerich)

ANTH 4151 Environmental Anthropology (Shenton)

HOD 3650 Environmental Politics and Justice (Safransky)

HOD 3890 Global Sustainable Development (Carse)

SOC 3315 Human Ecology and Society (Tzankova)

SOC 3318 Sociology of Green Jobs (Hess)

Spring 2017

This is a list of courses that can receive credit for the Minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies. If you identify a course that is not on the list, please contact Prof. Hess to see if it can qualify for the minor. Usually he will need to see the syllabus before granting a variance. Note: in some cases it is possible to count a B list course for the C list and vice-versa, so please contact Prof. Hess if you want to be considered for a variance.  Soc 3312, Soc 3316, and ENVS 4101 also count toward the major in Environmental Sociology. ENVS 4101 can be open to sophomores who have declared the major or minor and have taken other environmental courses.

Maymester: HART 3790 Monumental Landscapes of Provence. Will count toward the B list (humanities) courses.

A List (Science- and Technology-Intensive Courses)

BSCI 3223 Conservation Biology (Jorge)

EES 1030 Oceanography (Goodbred)

EES 1510 Dynamic Earth (Kelly)

EES 3220 Life Through Time (DeSantis)

EES 4650 Physics of the Climate System (Bennartz)

EES 4750 Sustainable System Science (Ayers)

ES 1001 Electrical Power Generation (Clark)

ENVE 3610 Sustainable Development (Troxel)

ENVE 4700 Energy and Water Resources (Hornberger)

B List (Humanities)

Amer 111 Food for Thought (Kevra)

ENGL 3730 Literature and the Environment (Goddu)

HIS 1470 History of Exploration (Sponsel)

C List (Social Science and Policy)

ANTH 1111 Fashioning Forests and Nature (Shenton)

ANTH 2200W Human Landscapes (Eberl)

ANTH 3261 Intro to GIS and Remote Sensing (Scaffadi)

PSCI 3253 Ethics and Public Policy (Ackerly)

Soc 3312 Environment and Development (Bandy).

Soc 3316 Business, Civil Society, and the Environment (Tzankova)

Capstone

ENVS 4101 Seminar in Environmental and Sustainability Studies (Hess). Open to minors in ESS and to majors in Environmental Sociology

Fall 2016

A List (Science- and Technology-Intensive Courses)

BSCI 1103 (Benson) Green Earth

BSCI 2238 (Jorge) Ecology

EES 1030 (Kelley) Oceanography

EES 1080 (Bennartz) Earth and Atmosphere

EES 1510 (Claiborne) Dynamic Earth

EES 2110 (Gilligan) Global Climate Change

EES 4680 (Oster) Paleoclimates

ENVE 4615 (Clarke) Environmental Assessments

 

B List (Humanities)

ENGL 3896 (Little) Special Topics…Climate Change. Note: This is a 2-credit course. You will need 18 credits for the minor, so please see Prof. Hess about different options.

HIST 1480 (Sponsel) Darwinian Revolutoin

PHIL 1111 (Breme) First Year Seminar: Green Cities

 

C List (Social Science and Policy)

ANTH 2019 (Conklin) Food Politics in America

ANTH 3629 (Staff) Introduction to GIS

SOC 1020 (Tzankova) Social Issues. Note that only her section of Soc 1020 counts toward the ESS minor. However, all sections count toward the Environmental Sociology major.

SOC 3313 (Hess) Sociology of Health and Environmental Science

SOC 3315 (Tzankova) Human Ecology and Society

SOC 3317 (Hess) Energy Transitions and Society

Spring 2016 Classes

This is a list of courses that can receive credit for the Minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies. If you identify a course that is not on the list, please contact Prof. Hess to see if it can qualify for the minor.

 

ENVS 4101 (Hess) Capstone seminar. This course is required for the minor for all students, and it is offered in the spring semester. If you are planning on studying abroad during the spring of your junior year, you may wish to take this course in your sophomore year. Otherwise, you will take it during the spring of your senior year.  If you are not yet a declared minor, you may contact Prof. Hess to get enrolled in the course. Sophomores who are motivated and have some background courses have done well in the seminar in the past. Contact Hess for a syllabus.
A List (Science- and Technology-Intensive Courses)

BSCI 1103 (Benson) Green Earth

BSCI 3233 (Jorge) Conservation Biology

EES 1030 (Kelly et al.) Oceanography

EES 1510 (Kelly et al.) Dynamic Earth

EES 3220 (DeSantis) Life through Time

EES 4650 (Bennartz) Physics of the Climate System

EES 5760 (Gilligan) Agent- and Individual-Based Computational Modeling. This will have significant environmental components to it and can count as an A list course.

ENVE 3610 (Troxel) Sustainable Development

 

B List (humanities)

ENGL 3720 (Aulakh) Literature, Science, and Technology. May count but confirm with Hess.

HIST 1520 (Sponsel) Science and the Sea. New course that will count toward the minor.

PHIL 3611 (Wood) Environmental Philosophy.

 

C List (social sciences and policy intensive)

ANTH 1001 (Melchor-Barz) Commons Seminar: Greening the Commons. 1 credit.

ANTH 3138 (Conklin) Global Food Politics

SOC 3314 (Bandy) Environmental Inequality and Justice

SOC 3316 (Tzankova) Business, Civil Society, and the Environment

SOC 3321 (Sana) Population and Society

 

Fall 2015 Classes

A List

BSCI 2238 (Jorge) Ecology

BSCI 2238L (Due-Goodwin) Ecology Lab

EES 1030 (Staff) Oceanography

EES 1080 (Bennartz) Earth and Atmosphere

EES 1510 (Morgan) Dynamic Earth

EES 2110 (Gilligan) Global Climate Change

EES 4750 (Ayer) Sustainable Systems Science

EES 4820 (DeSantis) Paleoecological Methods

ENVE 4615 (Clarke) Environmental Assessments

 

B List

AMER 1111 (Kevra) Food for Thought

AMER 4000 (Tichi) Blue Gold: Water Rights and Wrongs

ENGL 3730 (Goddu) Literature and the Environment

HIST 1480 (Sponsel) Darwinian Revolution

PHIL 1111 (Bremer) Green Cities

 

C List

ANTH 1111 (Shenton) Fashioning Forests and Nature

ANTH 4154 (Dillehay) Environmental Anthropology

HOD 3890 (Safransky) Special Topics in Community Leadership and Development. Environmental Politics and Justice

PSY 1111 (Schundt) Environment, Behavior, and Health

SOC 1020 (Tzankova) Social Issues: Food, Environment, and Society

SOC 3321 (Sana) Population and Society

SOC 3315 (Tzankova) Human Ecology and Society

SOC 4961 (Donato and Wilmot) Seminar: Sociology of Green Jobs

Spring 2015 Classes

A) Natural Science- and Technology-Intensive Courses (one from A list required for minor)

BSCI 118 Green Earth: Plants

BSCI 233 Conservation Biology

BSCI 237/238  Ecology Lab/Ecology

EES 101/111 Dynamic Earth/Dynamic Earth Lab

EES 114 Life and Climate

EES 220 Life Through Time

ENVE 220A  Sustainable Development

 

B) Humanities Courses

AMER 295 Global Warming: Science, Politics, Economy, Culture

ENGL 287 The Story of Climate Change: Exploring Environmental Crisis and Innovative Breakthrough

ENGL 288 Metamorphosis and Sea Change

HART 271  History of Landscape Design

PHIL 273 Environmental Philosophy

RLST 272 Religion and Ecology in Africa

 

C) Social-Behavioral Sciences and Policy Courses

ANTH 208 Food Politics in America

ANTH 294 Special Topics: Fashioning Forests, Fabricating Nature

PSY 115F Environment, Behavior, and Health

SOC 99-02 Psychology of Environmental Behavior

SOC 207 Climate Change and Society

Soc 220 Population and Society

D) Capstone

ENVS 278

 

Fall 2014 Classes

A) Natural Science- and Technology-Intensive Courses (one from A list required for minor)

BSCI 237 and 238 Ecology Lab and Ecology

EES 101 Dynamic Earth

EES 103 Oceanography

EES 108 Earth and Atmosphere

EES 115F Volcanoes

EES 115F Climate Change and Human History

EES 201 Global Climate Change

ENVE 264 Environmental Assessments

B) Humanities Courses

ENGL 245 Literature and the Environment

HIST 148 Darwinian Revolution

PHIL 115F  Green Cities

C) Social-Behavioral Sciences and Policy Courses

ANTH 207 Environmental Anthropology

HOD 2690 Environmental Geography and the City

SOC 206 Sociology of Health and Environmental Science

SOC 220 Population and Society

 

Spring 2014 Classes

A) Natural Science- and Technology-Intensive Courses (one from A list required for minor)

BSCI 118 The Green Earth: The Biodiversity and Evolution of Plants

BSCI 233 Conservation Biology

BSCI 238 Ecology (and BSCI 237 Ecology Lab)

EES 103 Oceanography (and EES 113 Oceanography Laboratory)

EES 107 Volcanoes: Impacts on Earth and Society

EES 205 Science, Risk, and Policy

EES 220 Life Though Time

EES 275 Sustainable Systems Science

ENVE 220a Sustainable Development

ENVE 296  Safety, Security, and Environmental Risk Management

ENVS 99 Commons Seminar (1 credit): Antarctic Exploration

B) Humanities Courses

AMER 295 Water Rights and Wrongs

ENGL 115F (9880 section only) Environmental Ethics in Beast Fables (Garcia section only)

WGS 270 Ecofeminism

C) Social-Behavior and Policy Courses

ENVS 99 Commons Seminar: Green Jobs 101 (1 credit)

SOC 220 Population and Society

SOC 208 Environment and Development

D) Capstone

ENVS 278 Seminar in Environmental and Sustainability Studies (for minors, open with permission to other advanced students—email Hess)

Fall 2013 Courses

A) Natural Science- and Technology-Intensive Courses

Anth 280 Prof. Wernke. Intro to Geographical Information Systems

BSCI 239. Prof. Jorge. Behavioral Ecology. (Hess will provide a variance to add this to the minor.)

EES 101 Prof. Morgan. Dynamic Earth

EES 103 Prof. Goodbread. Oceanography

EES 1115F. Prof. Gilligan. Science and Democracy (Hess will provide a variance to add this to the minor.)

EES 115F. Prof. Oster. Climate Change and Human History. (Hess will provide a variance to add this to the minor.)

EES 201 Prof. Gilligan. Global Climate Change.

ENVE 264. Prof. Clarke. Environmental Assessments

 

B) Humanities Courses

Amer 115F Prof. Kevra. Food for Thought

Amer 298 Senior Honors Research (counts if you do a thesis on an environmental and sustainability studies topic)

Phil 115F Prof. Bremer. Green Cities.

Phil 273 Prof. Wood. Environmental Philosophy.

Phil 274. Ethics and Animals.

 

 

C) Social-Behavioral Sciences and Policy Intensive Courses

Anthro 207. Prof. Netherly. Environmental Anthropology (Maymester)

Soc 102. Prof. Hess. Social Issues: Environment and Society. (Only this section of Soc 102 counts toward the minor.)

Soc 294. Prof. Hess. Climate Change and Society.

 

 

Spring 2013 Courses

Natural Science and Technology Intensive Courses:

BSCI 298 Abbott “Ecology”  TR 9:30-11, Lab T 1-4pm

EES 101 Morgan “Dynamic Earth” MWF 12-1pm

EES 103 Morgan “Oceanography” MWF 12-1pm

EES 107 Claiborne “Volcanoes: Impacts on Earth and Society” MWF 11-noon

EES 115F Claiborne “Volcanoes: Impacts on Earth and Society” TR 9:35-10:50

EES 205 Gilligan “Science, Risk, and Policy” TR 1:00-2:35 (variance)

EES 275 Ayers “Sustainable Systems” Time TBA

ENVE 254 Hornberger “Energy and Water Resources” MW 2-3:25 (variance) The course is oriented to graduate students but open to highly motivated, advanced undergraduates.

ES 101 Clarke Engineering Freshman Seminar: Energy Choices and the Environment R 2-4

 

Humanities:

AMER 115F Kevra “Food For Thought” MWF 1-2 and MWF 2-3pm

AMER 297 Goddu “Senior Seminar” (seniors only) M 3-5:40pm

ENGL 288 Nelson “Writing for an Endangered World:  Representative US Writers Tackle Sustainability” MW 8:45–10:00am

HART 260W Robinson “Ancient Landscapes” M 3-5:40pm

HIST 148 The Darwinian Revolution TR 2:35-3:50pm

PHIL 273 Wood “Environmental Philosophy” TR 4-5:15

WGS 268 Welch “Gender, Race, Justice, and the Environment” TR 2:35-3:50pm (variance)

 

Social Sciences:

Econ 228 Maneschi “Environmental Economics” Maneschi  MWF 1-2pm

Soc 206 Hess “Sociology of Health and Environmental Science” MWF 10-11am

 

Capstone:

ENV 278 Hess “Seminar in Environmental and Sustainability Studies.” MWF 9-10am. Open to minors in the junior and senior year, but please email David Hess if you are a sophomore or above and would like to take this course.