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VIDL On Location: MTSU’s College of Media and Entertainment

Posted by on Friday, August 21, 2015 in Coursera, MOOCs, News, , , , , .

VIDL’s Jeff Shoup and Aidan Hoyal were thrilled to join Assistant Professor of Musicology Jen Gunderman on location at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) to record interviews with Ken Paulson, Dean of the College of Media and Entertainment, and Greg Reish, Director of the Center for Popular Music. Gunderman is working with VIDL to produce Blair School of Music’s first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), scheduled to launch on the Coursera platform in early 2016.

Gunderman has been at the Blair School of Music since 2004, specializing in American pop and rock ’n’ roll history courses, but she is also an active studio session musician and producer, and she typically plays around 100 concerts each year with various artists.

MTSU is one of many Music City locations that will be featured in Gunderman’s upcoming course “Understanding the Music Business: What Is Music Worth?,” which will highlight perspectives from a variety of local music industry experts.

Gunderman notes, “Ken Paulson, Dean of the College of Media and Entertainment and former Editor-in-Chief of USA Today, is a longtime leader in the world of media and free expression, and we had a wide-ranging conversation about the current state of the entertainment industry that I think learners will enjoy very much.”

Jen Gunderman interviews Ken Paulson, Dean of the College of Media and Entertainment at MTSU.

The Center for Popular Music allowed us to film inside their archives, “a treasure trove of all things related to American vernacular music,” says Gunderman, adding, “Director Greg Reish and his staff arranged for us to examine rare examples of various audio formats and playback machines dating as far back as the 19th century, and a truly special bonus was being able to film Greg making a cylinder recording for us on an original Edison machine, which uses no electricity.”

Greg Reish, Director of MTSU's Center for Popular Music, discusses the history of audio recording with Jen Gunderman.

We agree with Gunderman when she says, “Our colleagues at MTSU could not have been more welcoming and accommodating, and I am grateful to them for sharing their expertise.”

Look for “Understanding the Music Industry: What is Music Worth?” on the Coursera platform in early 2016.

Reish performs a folk song while Martin Fisher records the sound using a hand-cranked Edison machine.

Reish performs a folk song while Martin Fisher records the sound using a hand-cranked Edison machine.

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