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Robert Penn Waren Center Category

From Bones to Flesh: On Writing Philosophy and Fiction 

Feb. 23, 2021—Kelly Oliver is Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University and author of three mystery series. Her latest, High Treason at the Grand Hotel, A Fiona Figg Mystery, came out on January 5th. After thirty years writing philosophy books—on such a broad range of topics that some scholars in my field wondered if I was writing philosophy at all—one stormy afternoon...

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Meet a Fellow: Fiacha Heneghan

Feb. 16, 2021—Fiacha Heneghan is a 2020-2021 Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities Graduate Student Fellow from the Philosophy Department. His dissertation concerns Kant’s conception of the good, its relation to the history of philosophy, and its significance for contemporary environmental issues. Before coming to Vanderbilt, Fiacha studied math and philosophy at DePaul University. His other interests...

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“Diabetes: History of Race and Disease”

Feb. 9, 2021—Arleen Tuchman is Nelson O. Tyrone, Jr. Chair in History and Professor of History at Vanderbilt University. She is also the author of Diabetes: History of Race and Disease. In 1985, my dad started feeling thirsty all the time. Because he was in his mid-60s, overweight, and had sugar in his urine, his doctor assumed that he had type 2 diabetes. I didn’t know it at the time,...

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3 Questions with Author John Patrick Leary

Feb. 1, 2021—John Patrick Leary will be the guest speaker for the Critical University Studies Seminar meeting on Wed., Feb. 3 at 3:30 PM. He will discuss “From Corporatese to Universities.” Register here. What do you mean by the word “corporatese” in terms of its use in universities, and how widespread is it? Well, “corporatese” isn’t my word...

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Meet a Fellow: Aimi Hamraie

Jan. 26, 2021—Meet Aimi Hamraie, a 2020-2021 RPW Center Faculty Fellow. This year’s group is exploring the theme of “Imagining Cities.” What does the phrase “Imagining Cities” mean to you?  My research for Enlivened City looks at the many ways that those who are involved in making cities—urban planners and designers, non-profit organizations, city governments, and everyday people—imagine the ideal...

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Meet a Fellow: Danielle M. Procope Bell

Dec. 1, 2020—Danielle M. Procope Bell is the 2020-2021 Elizabeth E. Fleming Graduate Student Fellow from the Department of English. Her research focuses on nineteenth century African American literature. What is your research about and why does it matter? I research nineteenth century Black women’s intellectual thought. This remains an understudied topic which not only serves to obfuscate the crucial...

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Meet a Fellow: Ashley Carse

Nov. 17, 2020—Meet Ashley Carse, a 2020-2021 RPW Center Faculty Fellow. This year’s group is exploring the theme of “Imagining Cities.” What does the phrase “Imagining Cities” mean to you? After a decade of work in Panama—specifically the region around the Panama Canal—my new book project led me to Savannah, Georgia. I grew up in the Atlanta suburbs,...

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Maptivists Promotes Youth Safety and Wellbeing

Nov. 10, 2020—Danielle Wilfong is the 2020-2021 RPW Center HASTAC Scholar We started our research project as an immersive tour of Nashville. Then, COVID-19 happened. Over the last four years, Maptivists, a cadre of high-school-aged researchers supported and trained by Oasis Center, Vanderbilt University, and Tennessee State University, has investigated how Nashville’s youth experience safety and wellbeing...

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Meet a Fellow: Mohammed Allehbi

Nov. 3, 2020—Mohammed Allehbi is the 2020-2021 George J. Graham Jr. Graduate Student Fellow from the Department of History. A sixth-year Ph.D. student in medieval Islamic history, his research focuses on the late Abbasid era. What is your research about and why does it matter? My dissertation is the first comprehensive study of the legal rift and political-divide...

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History and My Pandemic Journal – Steve Rubenfeld

Oct. 27, 2020—Steve Rubenfeld participated in this summer’s “Rethinking Pandemics: A Cultural History from Antiquity to Now” course offered through the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at Vanderbilt. OLLI helps adults over 50 rediscover the joy of learning and build community through diverse social interaction. Steve provided a video flip-through of his journal below, followed by his thoughts on the...

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