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Author Cristina Rivera Garza Named a 2020 MacArthur Fellow

Oct. 7, 2020—Cristina Rivera Garza, author of the new Vanderbilt University Press book The Restless Dead: Necrowriting and Disappropriation, has been named a 2020 MacArthur Fellow by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The MacArthur Foundation awards its fellowships—known colloquially as “Genius grants”—annually to individuals for “extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits.” Winners...

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The Ryman Auditorium and Architecture of Middle Tennessee

Sep. 14, 2020—Nashville has seen unprecedented growth in recent decades, and the city continues to wrestle with questions about the preservation of its historic structures. A new reissue of Architecture of Middle Tennessee—now available from Vanderbilt UP—revisits and expands upon a book that wrestled with similar questions almost half a century ago. When it was first published in 1974, Architecture...

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Excerpt: Hidden Nature

Aug. 18, 2020—More than 10,000 known caves lie beneath the state of Tennessee according to the Tennessee Cave Survey, a nonprofit organization that catalogs and maps them. Thousands more riddle surrounding states. In the new book Hidden Nature: Wild Southern Caves, officially out this week from Vanderbilt UP, Michael Ray Taylor tells the story of this vast underground...

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Excerpt: What the Signs Say

Jun. 15, 2020—What the Signs Say: Language, Gentrification, and Place-Making in Brooklyn is officially out this week from Vanderbilt UP. Written by Shonna Trinch and Edward Snajdr, the book explores the impact of storefronts and their signage and argues that the public language of storefronts is a key component to the creation of the place known as Brooklyn,...

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The Legacy of One of Our Most Important Books

Jun. 10, 2020—In this staff post, Vanderbilt UP Marketing and Sales Manager Betsy Phillips reflects on the checkered legacy of one of VUP’s most important books in our 80-year history: A Vanderbilt Miscellany. The Legacy of One of Our Most Important Books by Betsy Phillips As a part of Vanderbilt UP’s 80th Anniversary commemoration this year, we wanted...

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Author Post: Finding Indigenous Women in Nineteenth-Century Argentine Anthropology

May. 15, 2020—As part of Vanderbilt UP’s celebration of the Latin American Studies Association LASA2020 virtual congress this week, we welcome a guest post today from Ashley Elizabeth Kerr, author of Sex, Skulls, and Citizens: Gender and Racial Science in Argentina (1860–1910). Finding Indigenous Women in Nineteenth-Century Argentine Anthropology by Ashley Elizabeth Kerr At some point in my research...

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What We’re Reading: The Great Shut-In

Apr. 20, 2020—With so many staying home to try to help #FlattenTheCurve during the COVID-19 crisis, we at Vanderbilt UP wanted to share a list of books we’ve been reading and enjoying lately as we all shelter in place. We hope you are healthy and safe and able to take some time for reading. Anarchaeologies: Reading as...

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Excerpt: Food, Texts, and Cultures in Latin America and Spain

Apr. 17, 2020—Food, Texts, and Cultures in Latin America and Spain is officially out this week from Vanderbilt UP. Edited by Rafael Climent-Espino and Ana M. Gómez-Bravo, the book comprises 14 essays that showcase the eye-opening potential of a food lens within colonial studies, ethnic and racial studies, gender and sexuality studies, and studies of power dynamics,...

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Excerpt: Between the Rocks and the Stars

Apr. 15, 2020—Vanderbilt UP is excited to share that we have two new books out this week. The first is Between the Rocks and the Stars: Narratives in Natural History by Stephen Daubert. Between the Rocks and the Stars dives deep into the relationships that shape the natural world. It presents a collection of vignettes from the...

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Excerpt: Sex, Skulls, and Citizens

Mar. 16, 2020—Vanderbilt UP has a new book out this week—Sex, Skulls, and Citizens: Gender and Racial Science in Argentina (1860–1910) by Ashley Elizabeth Kerr. Analyzing a wide variety of late-nineteenth-century sources, Sex, Skulls, and Citizens argues that Argentine scientific projects of the era were not just racial encounters, but were also conditioned by sexual relationships in...

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